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Friday, 7 December 2012

The Sibbald Family of Renfrewshire and Dublin


My grandfather, Bertie Stewart, had an older sister, Helen Louisa Stewart, who married John Thomas Sibbald in Dublin in 1925 - their children, my father's cousins, were Hazel and Les Sibbald.  This post, therefore, is about the Sibbald family.  I sourced all the info for this on Ancestry.com,  the LDS site and free online records for Mount Jerome cemetery.

James and Hannah Sibbald:
James Sibbald was baptised at Fallhills, Carstairs, Lanarkshire on 24th March 1769. He married Hannah Gracie (1773 - 1855) who had been born at Crawfordjohn, and farmed at Knowes Farm, Houston, Lanarkshire, where he died in February 1853.  Their children were as follows:

James, who died young, born 30th July 1798.
Janet
Mary 25th July 1800 - 1877.
James, born 14th January 1805.
Margaret 1802 - 1840.
Jean 1806 - 1846.
Thomas 1808 - 1846.
Isabel born 1810.
John 1812 - 1890. Moved to Dublin.
Agnes.

The Scottish census of 1851 shows James Sibbald at Knowes Farm, along with his wife, Hannah, and two of his adult children - Mary and Thomas, who would remain there all their lives.  A niece, Hannah, born in nearby Paisley in 1841, was also there. Hannah was the niece of Mary and Thomas, and the grand-niece of James.

John Sibbald:
The son of James and Hannah Sibbald of Knowes Farm, John Sibbald, was born in Houston, Renfrewshire, on 21st July 1812.
His first wife was Janet Frame, born 4th May 1821 to John Frame and Isabel Lindsay at Braidwood, Carluke, Lanarkshire. They married in Paisley on 7th December 1838, and appeared on the 1851 census at 30 Scotland Street, Govan, Glasgow, where John was working as a carrier's porter.  The couple had two daughters at this stage, Euphemia and Elizabeth.
At some stage in the next few years, possibly 1856, John and Janet Sibbald moved to Clondalkin, Co. Dublin, where John worked as a land steward at Baldonnell  (possibly at the Grierson property, Baldonnell House) and where Janet died on 15th October 1857.  They had had 6 children by this stage -

1) Euphemia 1839 - 1915.  Euphemia Sibbald never married, and lived with her uncle Thomas Sibbald, and her unmarried aunt, Mary Sibbald, at, the family farm in Houston.

2) Hannah, born 13th June 1841 at Abbey, Paisley; died 1904. Moved home to Scotland to the family farm with her sister, Euphemia, and younger brother, John, following her mother's death in 1857.

3) Elizabeth, born 1843. (This daughter must have died; she wasn't present in 1851.)

4) James 1854 - 1882.  Was buried in Mount Jerome, Dublin.

5) Thomas 1856 - 1921. He had been born in Dublin and later worked as a land steward for the Talbot family of Malahide Castle at their property, Robbs Wall Castle, and married Matilda Shields Little of Ballibay, Co. Monaghan, the daughter of a farmer, Robert Little. The couple married on 31st July 1884 in Crieve, Co. Monaghan, and the wedding was witnessed by Isaiah and Mary Jane King.
 Matilda Shields Sibbald died at Robbswall, Malahide, aged 58 on 13th June 1918; her widower, Thomas Sibbald died there on 30th January 1921.  His sister, Mary Kyle, was present.

6) John 1857 - 1918.  The 1861 Scottish census shows him living, aged 3, with his uncle and aunt, Thomas and Mary Sibbald, at Knowes Farm, Scotland, along with his older sisters, Euphemia and Hannah.  He stayed in Scotland and farmed the family farm at Houston, Renfrewshire. He married Margaret and had Mary, Allan and John.

Following the premature death of his first wife in Dublin in 1857, John Sibbald of Clondalkin, married a second time, this time to Hannah Roberts.  She had been born in Bangor, Wales in about 1835.  The couple married in Bangor, Wales, on 23rd September 1859, but their children were born in Dublin:

1) Eleanor Sibbald.

2) Helen Sibbald. On 3rd December 1890 in Bray, Co. Wicklow, Helen Sibbald of Cabinteely, Co. Dublin, the daughter of steward John Sibbald, married gardener John Cruickshank of Shanganagh Park, son of a farmer William Cruickshank.  Mary Sibbald and John Falconer were the witnesses.

3) Robert Sibbald. Born in 1860, he died of TB in Cabinteely on 18th August 1883.  At the time of his death he was working as a waiter;  his mother, Hannah, was present at his death.

4) Mary, born 3th June 1864 at Clondalkin. On 21st December 1893 in Killiney Church,  Mary Sibbald married  a coachman, Joseph Kyle of Tyrone, who was living at 10 Herbert Street, Dublin. He was the son of Robert Kyle, also a coachman.  Mary Sibbald's address in 1893 was The Glebe, Killiney, and her wedding to Joseph Kyle was witnessed by Samuel Sibbald and Robert McCreedy.

In 1901, Joseph and Mary were living at Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin, with their two daughters, Kathleen and Nora Kyle.  In 1911, the family were living in St. Stephen's Green.   Mary Sibbald Kyle died in Killiney on 10th August 1927, while her husband, Joseph Kyle, died later on 5th January 1945.  Their daughter, Nora, married a J.C. Fitzgerald - Nora died on 5th December 1980, while J.C. Fitzgerald died on 16th April 1974. The second daughter of Joseph Kyle and Mary Sibbald, Kathleen Mary L. Kyle, died on 15th December 1977.  The family were buried in Mount Jerome.

5) Richard 1866, married Elizabeth Richardson. Land steward.

6) Samuel 1868 - 1941.  Also a land steward.  He married, firstly, sarah Ann Rogers of Killiney, the daughter of a farmer William John Rogers. This first marriage occurred on 29th April 1902, and Samuel Sibblad was living in Cabinteely, the son of land steward John Sibbald. The witnesses to this first marriage were Edmond Henry Evans and Mina Croute.     Anne Sibbald, née Rogers, of Kilbogget,  died in the Rotunda Hospital, probably as a result of complications during childbirth, on 5th May 1904 aged only 30.


Samuel Sibbald, son of John Sibbald and Hannah Roberts, married, as his second wife,  Annie Harrison of Armagh in Rathdown on 21st February 1906.  They had Eveline May Sibbald on 17th September 1909, Richard Victor Sibbald on 9th June 1907 and Annie Olive Sibbald on 27th October 1911.
Samuel, and his wife, Annie, lived at Kilbogget near Killiney, Co. Dublin, where Samuel was the land steward for Kilbogget Farm.  It was here that his father, John Sibbald, died in 1890.

One of Samuel Sibbald's daughters was Ivy Cromie Sibbald, a clerk of 43 Upper Mount Street in 1929.  She married, on 13th June 1929 in Stephen's Green Unitarian Church, a journalist, Geoffrey Hugh Matthew Coulter of 22 South Anne Street, the son of a retired bank manager, Matthew Thomas Coulter.  The witnesses were Thomas B. Rudhouse (?) Brown and George Thompson.

A second daughter of Samuel Sibbald, land agent, was Evaline May Sibbald of Glenageary Park, Dunlaoghaire, who married George Lennon, a cashier of 28 Upper Pembroke Street, son of George Lennon, in Kingstown Church on 14th July 1939.  The witnesses were Joseph Kyle and Olive Ann Sibbald.

When Samuel Sibbald, land steward, died in Glenageary aged 73, on 23rd May 1941, his daughter Olive Anne Sibbald was there.

7) Janet Sibbald was born in Baldonnel on 13th March 1870 to the land steward John and Hannah Sibbald.  She married, in Ormond Quay Church on 26th April 1894, a Kildare builder, John Eacret, son of a builder Michael Eacret. John Eacret was living at Mountain View, Ballybrack, and Janet Sibbald was living at Kilbogget, Cabinteely,  The witnesses were Margaret Sibbald and John Thomas Hutchison.
   John and Janet Eacret settled in Naas, Co. Kildare with their children, John Eacret who had been born in Oldtown, Co. Kildare, on 20th September 1900, and later Lucy Patricia Eacret who had been born there on 7th March 1907.
   
John Eacret had been born in Co. Kildare to a farmer, Michael Eacret, and to Lucy Sheridan.  Other children of William Eacret and Lucy Sheridan, all Kildare-born, were:
       William Henry Eacret, born 25th December 1871.
        Michael Eacret, born 10th November 1873.
        George James Eacret, born at Old Grange, Kildare, on 10th April 1878.
        Frederick Eacret, born at Old Grange, Kildare, on 29th January 1881
        Mary Jane Eacret, born 18th January 1867.
John Eacret's father, Michael Eacret, died on 5th January 1896 at Old Grange, Monasterevan, Co. Kildare, and the primary beneficiary of his will was his son, the master builder, John Eacret, then resident at Mentone Road, Killiney, Co. Dublin.

8) Margaret Sibbald born 8th November 1872 at Kilbogget, Cabinteely, Co. Dublin, to John Sibbald and Hannah Roberts.
Margaret Sibbald married a Kilkenny RIC man, Samuel Treacy, in Killliney Parish Church on 24th April 1895. Samuel's father was a farmer, William Treacy, and the witnesses to the wedding were Leeson Treacy and Samuel Sibbald.
 Margaret and Samuel Treacy moved to Belfast where they had four children:
    a)  Ernest William Sibbald Treacy, born Co. Down 1896, who married, on 25th August 1920 in Willowfield Church of Ireland, Belfast, Co. Down, Evelyn May Hester Morris.  She had been born on 28th April 1899 in Southampton, New York, to the Cavan-born Robert Morris and his wife Minnie Bryson.  Evelyn May died in Belfast on 21st April 1982.     Ernest William Sibbald Treacy was an accomplished musician, the director of the Trocadero Sextet who were the resident dance band at the Trocadero Restaurant in Portrush, Co. Antrim.  He regularly broadcast on the BBC, and was a personal friend of Edward VIII, meeting up with him in Dublin on a number of occasions (this from the Treacy family).   From 'The Radio Times' of 15th August 1930:   'The afternoon concert on Friday, August 29, will be provided by the Trocadero Sextet, directed by E.W. Sibbald Treacy, and relayed from the Trocadero Restaurant, Portrush.  Besides being musical director of the sextet, Mr. Treacy is responsible for the dance band at the Northern Counties Hotel in this County Antrim seaside resort.  His interest in dance music began when he visited America eight years ago and came into contact with Schneider's band in New York and Pennsylvannia.  Shortly after this he completed a tour through Europe with with an American band, and the experience gained in this direction has been made full use of by Mr. Treacy, with the result that his sextet has proved itself the finest café orchestra in the Province.'
      Ernest W.S. Treacy and Evelyn May Hester Morris evetually divorced and both remarried;  together they had four children - Audrey Sibbald Treacy, born in Belfast in 1921, the twins Ethel  Gertrude Melbourne Sibbald Treacy  and Patricia (known as Daisy) Treacy born on 30th April 1926 in Belfast, and the youngest, Brian Sibbald Treacy born in Belfast.
  Ethel Melbourne Sibbald Treacy (1926 - 2009) married Robert LLoyd Woods (born 1912 in Belfast, died 22nd March 1978), whose daughter Rosemary shared this family info with me.  If you wish to contact Rosemary, you can contact her at Foffee3@Aol.com.

    b)  Ethel Elizabeth Audrey Treacy, born Co. Down circa 1901.
    c) Samuel Treacy, born Co. Down circa 1902.
    d) Austin Treacy, born Co. Down circa 1904.

Following the death of his brother, Thomas Sibbald, at Knowe Farm on 20th January 1871, John Sibbald settled his late father's estate by selling his entitlement to the family farm to his sister, Mary Sibbald, for £200.

'To Miss Mary Sibbald residing at Know in the United Parishes of Houston and Killillan,
I, John Sibbald, Land Steward of Baldonnel, Clondalking, County Dublin, Ireland, do hereby offer to accept of payment from you, of the sum of two hundred pounds sterling in full of all I can ask or claim out of the estates of my father the late James Sibbald and of my brother, the late Thomas Sibbald, farmers at Knows with both of which estates you have intromitted and the said sum being also in full satisfaction of me of all right title and claim, if any, which I have in and to the lease of the farm of Knows held by the said thomas Sibbald my brother at the time of his death on the 20th of January last, which in so far as i have right or claim thereto in any way, I give up to you in order that you may possess said farm to the end of said lease and upon your acceptance of this offer and payment to me of the foresaid sum, I will grant in your favour all requisite discharges of my shares in the foresaid estates if (sic) the said James Sibbald and Thomas Sibbald and will also execute any deeds or writings necessary to be granted by me in your favour, or otherwise for enabling you to possess said farm under the foresaid lease which was held by the said Thomas Sibbald.  In witness whereof I subscribe this offer the seventh day of February eighteen hundred and seventy one before these witnesses, Andrew Fleming Farmer Fulwood, and John Young, Farmer at Ibester (?) Fulwood, both in the parish of Houston,
                                                                                                     John Sibbald.'

The will of Mr. William Hone, Junior, of Yapton, Monkstown, Dublin, dated September 20th 1888, mentioned John Sibbald.  William left £100 to each of his brothers, and a further £100 to his steward John Sibbald.  Kilbogget was mentioned in the will - presumably William Hone was the owner of this property where both John Sibbald and his son, Samuel, were the land stewards

John Sibbald, land steward, died in Dublin in 1890, and was buried in Mount Jerome cemetery; his wife, Hannah Roberts, had died earlier in 1887:
   'In Loving Memory of John Sibbald, Kilbogget, Co. Dublin, died October 17th 1890 aged 78.  And Hannah his wife died April 5th 1887 aged 52.  James Sibbald died April 13th 1882 aged 28 years.  Robert Sibbald died August 17th 1883 aged 23 years.  Matilda Shields Sibbald died 13th June 1918 aged 58 years, dearly beloved wife of Thomas Sibbald.  Also the above-named Thomas Sibbald who died 30th January 1921 aged 64.'

Richard Sibbald (1866 - 1910) and Elizabeth Richardson:
Richard Sibbald had been born in Clondalkin, Dublin to John and Hannah Sibbald on 19th August 1866.
Richard Sibbald, land steward of St. Doulough's, Dublin, son of steward John Sibbald, married Elizabeth Richardson, the daughter of Thomas  Richardson, a gardener of St. Doulough's. The couple married on 20th May 1891 in Ormond Quay Church and was witnessed by Margaret Richardson and John Cruickshank.
Elizabeth Richardson had been born in the Swords area of North Dublin in 1873, and died in Dublin in late 1950.
The family lived in St. Doolagh's, Coolock, North Dublin;  they had three children before Richard died young in 1910.

The Irish Times:  'June 26th 1910 at St. Dolough's, Dublin, Richard Sibbald, son of the late John Sibbald of Kilbogget.'

Elizabeth Sibbald, née Richardson, died a widow aged 77, in St. Doulough's, Raheny, on 16th November 1950.

(The Family of Elizabeth Richardson:  Elizabeth Richardson was the daughter of a Tyrone couple, Thomas Richardson and Mary Clarke, who had married on 12th October 1866 in Drumglass, Co. Tyrone.  The father of Thomas Richardson was James Richardson; the father of Mary Clarke was James Clarke, who was a farmer of Killyneal, Drumglass, and who died on 2nd October 1890.
Thomas Richardson and Mary Clarke had an unnamed son in Co. Tyrone on 29th June 1867, but the remainder of their children were born in Dublin....
    Mary Richardson, born 18th December 1869.
    Margaret Richardson, born Malahide, Co. Dublin, on 18th November 1870.
    Elizabeth Richardson, who later married Richard Sibbald, was born in Dublin circa 1873.
    Caroline Richardson, born Coolock/Drumcondra, Co. Dublin, on 23rd April 1875.
    Annie Richardson, born Abbyville, Co. Dublin, on 18th October 1879.
    Thomas Richardson, born Dublin in about 1878.
     William T. Richardson, born Dublin in about 1882.

The widowed Mary Richardson appears on both the 1901 and 1911 census living two houses apart on the same street as Richard and Elizabeth Sibbald, ie, St. Doolough's in Coolock.  Three of her unmarried children were with her - Annie, Thomas and William.  The two sons worked in a solicitor's office.)
 

The children of Richard Sibbald and Elizabeth Richardson:

1) John Thomas Sibbald, born 8th October 1892, who follows.

2)Mary/May Sibbald 19th May 1896 in St. Doolough's, Raheny.  May Sibbald's marriage was recorded in the Irish Times:
    'Lynn and Sibbald - March 9th 1921, Clontarf Presbyterian Church.  Andrew Lynn, elder son of Mr. and Mrs. David Lynn, 103 My Lady's Road, Belfast,  to May, eldest daughter of the late Richard Sibbald of St. Dolough's, Raheny, and Mrs. Sibbald, 9 Royal Terrace, Fairview.'
   
At the time of his marriage to Mary Sibbald, Andrew Lynn was living at 41 Addison Road in Fariview, while the bride was at 9 Royal Terrace.  The witnesses were Eveleen Sibbald and William Meneeley.
 
Andrew McIlroy Lynn, aged 6, was living with his family in Templepatrick, Co. Antrim in 1901.  His father, David Lynn, was a farm labourer who was married to Agnes Lynn.  By 1911 the family had moved to Ballygomartin, Shankhill, Belfast where David Lynn now worked in a linen factory.  The other children of David and Agnes Lynn were Isabella Elizabeth Lynn, Samuel McKeown Lynn, Margaret Jane Lynn and Agnew McKeown Bride Lynn.   Also present in 1911 was David Lynn's sister-in-law, Elizabeth McKeown, and a niece, Jane McKeown.

   Mary Sibbald Lynn died on 21st June 1936, aged 40.  Her husband, Andrew Lynn, died aged 72 on 31st January 1966.  A son, David Lynn, died aged 9 on 22nd January 1934, and a second son, Richard Lynn, died aged 84 on 7th June 2007.

3) Eveleen Sibbald born  11th January 1899.  A clerk, Eveleen Sibbald never married and died, aged 46, on 7th February 1935 at 9 Royal Terrace, Fairview.  Her brother, John Thomas Sibbald of 11 Waverley Avenue was present at her death.


John Thomas Sibbald and Louisa Helen Sibbald:

John Thomas Sibbald, a railway clerk of 9 Royal Terrace, Fairvew, the son of land agent Richard Sibbald and of Elizabeth Richardson, married Louisa Helen Stewart, the daughter of book-keeper Robert Stewart and his wife, Rebecca Cuthbert, my great grandparents.  At the time of the wedding, which took place on 22nd September 1925 in Holy Trinity Church, Rathmines, Louisa Helen Stewart was living at the home of her paternal uncle, Joseph Stewart, at 33 Grosvenor Road in Rathmines, rather than her family home at 25 Edenvale Road.   Her father, Robert Stewart, acted as one of the witnesses at her wedding to John Thomas Sibbald, as did her sister, Vera Stewart and the man who would later marry Vera, Robert Irwin.

John Thomas Sibbald and Louisa Helen Stewart were the parents of my father's first cousins, Leslie and Hazel.  The family lived at 11 Waverly Avenue, Fairview - Louisa Helen's elderly father, our great-grandfather Robert Stewart, lived here with them at the end of his life in the 1940's.
John Thomas Sibbald worked at Islandbridge as a clerk for the Western Railway Company, before working as the secretary to J & R Thompsons' builders of Fairview.    The family were all intensely musical - Hazel played the piano, her brother Leslie the violin;  their maternal aunt, Vera Stewart, was also an accomplished pianist and would become the accompanist for her husband, the tenor Robert Irwin.  The sisters' brother, Cuthbert, our grandfather, had attended St. Patrick's Cathedral School along with Robert Irwin, and both were members of the Cathedral choir.

The birth of one of the children was noted in The Irish Times:  'Sibbald - July 4th 1932, at 29 Upper Mount Street, Dublin, to Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Sibbald, 11 Waverly Avenue, Fairview.'
This was John Leslie Sibbald, known as Leslie;  his sister, Sylvia Hazel Sibbald, known as Hazel, had been born earlier in 1928.

John Thomas Sibbald died at 9 Royal Terrace, Fairview, on 29th April 1948.

Mount Jerome headstone:  'In Loving Memory of John Thomas Sibbald called to higher service 29th April 1948.  Also his beloved wife Louisa Helen who fell asleep 8th March 1977...'

On June 1st 1953, the wedding took place of Sylvia Hazel Sibbald and John Victor Dewar.  They married in the Clontarf Presbyterian Church.   John Victor Dewar was the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Dewar of 22 Dromard Avenue, Sandymount, while Sylvia Hazel was the daughter of the late John Thomas Sibbald of 9 Inverness Road, Fairview.     The bride was given away by her brother, J. Leslie Sibbald,  the best man was Sidney Dewar, and the usher was our paternal grandfather, Cuthbert Stewart, whose sister, Louisa Helen, was the bride's mother.
The groom, John Victor Dewar, was the organist for Clontarf Presbyterian Church where they married. The couple moved to Athlone, Co. Roscommon, where John worked for Cadbury's,  but he worked also as the organist for Ballinasloe Church of Ireland, and also in Athlone.

Hazel Dewar, née Sibbald, sadly passed away on 11th December 2013 in Athlone.








Thursday, 29 November 2012

Mary Williams, second wife of John Jeffery Williams


This post concerns Mary Oliver, who was the second wife of the lawyer, John Jeffery Williams of Grays Inn, and their daughter, Mary Williams.

I am interested in the family of London lawyer John Jeffery Williams, since he is possibly the father of our maternal great-great grandfather Richard Williams of Eden Quay, Dublin, who worked for the Dublin Steam Packet Company which had been founded by Dublin-based cousins of the London Williams family.
http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2011/11/john-jeffery-williams-father-of-richard.html

http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2011/08/richard-williams-and-geraldine-omoore.html

http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2012/04/updated-williams-genealogy.html

Following the death of his first wife, Sarah Dignan, John Jeffery Williams married Mary Oliver of St. Osyth/Alresford in Essex, who lived from 1786 until 18th July 1873.  The couple must have married in about 1811, judging by the births of their three children.  Richard was born in Holborn on 24th July 1812 (and this might possibly be our Dublin-based great-great grandfather who had been born to a John Williams in 1812),  Mary was born in September 1813, and Henry Jeffery Williams was born in August 1815, a few months after the death of his own father.
John Jeffery's children by his first marriage to Sarah Dignan had all been born much earlier than this second batch - John Dignan Williams in 1789, Hutchins Thomas Williams in 1790,  Sarah in 1794,  William in 1795, Harriet No.One in 1796, Harriet No. Two in 1798. There was, therefore, a 14 year gap between Harriet and Richard.

Following their father's death in 1815, at least two, and possibly more, of John Jeffery's older children moved to Dublin.  John Dignan Williams and Hutchins Thomas Williams operated there in linen and finance, and Hutchins was known to have had a sister living with him at 39 Dame Street in the 1820's, but which sister?  Following the failure of Hutchins' finance company, 'Gibbons and Williams' in 1835, he left Ireland for good and headed with his family, first to New York and then to Simcoe, Ontario.  John Dignan Williams seems to have maintained a business presence in Dublin from about 1814 until about 1841,  but his Irish-born family were living in London again by 1841.  A daughter, Marie Antoinette Williams married Daniel Henry Rucker in Dublin in 1847.  John Dignan died in London in 1858.


Mary Williams (born 1814) , daughter of John Jeffery Williams and Mary Oliver, married Rev. Samuel Farman (1808 - 1878) on 28th April 1835 in the Church of St. John of Jerusalem in South Hackney, London.    The wedding was witnessed by Mary's widowed mother, Mary Williams, and by an associate of the Oliver family, William Genery.
Samuel Farman had been ordained as a curate in 1834, and as a priest in 1838.  The family, however, spent several of these years living in Istanbul/Constantinople, and the first of the couple's 13 children were born there, Mary in 1836, and the twins, Charles and Emily, in early 1838.
In 1831, Samuel Farman had been appointed by The London Society for Promoting Christianity Among the Jews as assistant to Rev. John Nicolayson, and together the pair travelled widely around the Middle East.  The pair were noted in Beirut, Malta, Algiers and Tripoli.  Samuel was ordained deacon by Blomfield (I'm unsure who this was) on 12th December 1824, and commenced work in Constantinople in 1835,  presumably following his marriage to Mary Williams.  He left the city briefly during an outbreak of plague, and, during his absence, embarked upon a Judeo-Spanish translation of the scriptures.  Following his return to Constantinople, he settled in the Galata district.  He circulated the scriptures in Hebrew, and converted three Jews to Christianity. Rev. Samuel Farman resigned in 1841 and returned to England.  This info was found online in 'The History of the London Society for Promoting Christianity Among the Jews'.

1841 Census:
Six years after their marriage, Mary and Samuel Farman were back in England, living in John St., Hampstead, along with Mary's mother, Mary Williams and the three Farman children - 5-yr-old Mary Farman, and the 18-month-old twins, Charles and Emily.

In 1844, Rev. Samuel Farman, who had attended St. John's College, Cambridge, had become the rector of Layer Marney Church in Essex, following a stint in Peldon.  His mother-in-law, Mary Williams, had her origins nearby in Alresford, and Mary's sister, Sarah Oliver (born 1780)  had recommended Samuel for the job in Layer Marney.  In an 1871 directory for Layer Marney,  Mary Williams was noted as the lady of the manor.
Rev. Samuel Farman built the schoolhouse next to the Rectory in 1850, and carried out the restoration of the church in 1870.  He published several works over the years -  'Part of the Hebrew and Spanish Scripture',  'Il futuro Destino d'Israele' and 'Constantinople in connection with the present war' (1855).

By 1851, the census shows the family at Layer Marney.  Along with Mary, Emily (also called Oratia) and Charles, there was Harriet born 1840 in Sussex, Thomas Frederick born Layer Marney in 1845, Margaret born Layer Marney in 1848, Anna born Layer Marney in 1849, Anna born Layer Marney in 1850, and baby Thomas born 1851.    A further son, Samuel, had been born in Constantinople in about 1838, but he was boarding in 1851 at the Collegiate School in Leicester.
Rev. Samuel himself had been born in Ipswich, Suffolk in about 1808.   His mother-in-law, Mary Williams, was also there, named as a fund holder who had been born in nearby Alresford, Essex, in about 1786.  The family had three servants.

Mary Williams was still with them in Layer Marney in 1861 and was described on the census as a landed proprietor of 452 acres employing 3 boys and 17 labourers. A conveyance of 1859 records the sale to Mrs. Williams under the will of Quintin Dick for £30,448 of Tower Farm, 635 acres and Thorrington Farm, 205 acres.  Her will shows that she also had a property in London.
By 1861,  Samuel and Mary Farman had had two additional children - Samuel George born in 1853 and who later became the vicar of St. John's in Colchester before converting to Catholicism in 1880, and Susan born 1854.

Mary Williams continued to live with her daughter and son-in-law at Layer Marney until her death on 18th July 1873.  Her will was proved by two of her Farman grandchildren, the younger Rev. Samuel Farman (rector of Layer Marney, Colchester and then Harwich) of St.Martin's, Colchester, and Edward Farman of 21 Lion Terrace, Portsea.

The younger Rev. Samuel Farman married Clara Letitia Clarke, the second daughter of J.P. Clarke, Esq., of de Montfort Square, Leicester.  The wedding took place on 6th February 1861 in St. John's Church, Leicester.
The younger Rev. Samuel Farman's youngest son, Harold Augustus Farman, who married, on April 9th 1946, at St. Paul's, Clacton-on-Sea,  Florence Mary Pullin, who was the daughter of Stephen Pullin of Frogmore, Hayes, Middlesex.   Harold Augustus Farman died shortly after his marriage on December 14th 1948 - he was living at the Westleigh Hotel, 33 Carnarvon Road, Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, and his death notice in The Times noted that he was formerly a partner in 'Farman Daniell & Co.' of 329 High Holborn, solicitors. He was 83 when he died.

In the 1980s, Jane Eames of Essex researched the villages of Layer Marney,  Birch and Layer Breton, and the research has been published online.  She had accessed the will of Mary Williams, widow of John Jeffery Williams.  Nearly all of the beneficiaries of her will had to make an annual payment to an Elizabeth Gentry of St. Osyth, Essex,  the payments being 'in lieu of and in satisfaction of the annuity whereon the proper duty to Government has been paid which was bequeathed to the said Elizabeth Gentry by the will of my late sister Sarah Oliver  . . . . .  charged upon and made payable out of the annual proceeds of certain personal estate thereby bequeathed to me.'
Elizabeth Gentry appeared on the 1871 census at nearby St. Osyth working as a housekeeper.  The 1835 marriage of Mary's daughter, Mary, to Samuel Farman, had been witnessed by a William Gentry, so there must have been some family connection between the Oliver and Gentry families.
Mary Williams left most of her substantial effects to her grandchildren, including a London property which was left to her oldest granddaughter, Mary, who went on to marry Rev. Thomas Ralph Musselwhite, vicar of West Mersea.

Nothing was left to Mary's son-in-law, Samuel Farman, but Mary Williams left £100 to her son, Henry Williams although the will doesn't mention where he lived, and I've had no luck tracking him down. Her second son, Richard, wasn't mentioned at all.  Henry married Eliza Richer in 1840, and then promptly disappears from view.  Similarly, I can find no sign of Richard anywhere on the various UK censuses.  She seems to have had little contact with her two sons.  Henry was a bookkeeper;  our great-great grandfather, Richard Williams, worked also as a bookkeeper for the Williams family shipping business in Dublin, and was born circa 1812, to a John Williams, as was Mary Williams' son, Richard.  Although I've yet to discover any definite link between the two Richards, I suspect that they may well be one and the same man.  If Hutchins Thomas Williams had a sister living with him in Dublin in the late 1820's, then it's not beyond the realm of reason that he may have had a younger brother living there also, especially one being trained in as an accountant in a finance business.  Our Richard Williams made his first appearance at the headquarters of the CDSPCo in 1837, two years after Hutchins Thomas left Ireland for New York, but was only taken on as the accountant to the company in 1839.  This, for the moment, is only circumstantial, and I would need to source better information to prove this one way or the other.

To return to Mary Williams' 1873 will....the unmarried granddaughter of Mary Williams, Oratia and Susan, both received a legacy payable on their marriage or at their mother's death.  The other two married daughters, Margaret, wife of Henry Garnell and Harriet wife of Walter Hammond Thelwall each received £500.  The surviving sons, Samuel, Charles, Thomas, and Edward were made the residuary by their grandmother.
Henry Garnell, who married Margaret Farman, was a shipbroker who'd been born in Croyden, Surrey in about 1836.  In 1881 Henry and Margaret were living in Tottenham with two children Henry, born in Newcastle in 1877, and Sybil F., born in Kensington in 1879.  By 1891, they had two extra children - Gladys C. Garnell/Gannell, born 1883, and Margaret F.D. Gannell, born 1891.


The will mentions that Sarah Oliver was the sister of Mary Williams, née Oliver.  Another sibling appears to be Thomas Oliver who himself made a will on 2nd November 1869, in which he left shares in a railway company to Rev. Thomas Ralph Musselwhite, who was married to his niece, Mary Farman.  Thomas Oliver appeared as an unmarried lodger in Hanover square on the 1871 Census;  he had been born in St. Osyth - as had Mary Williams, his sister - in about 1790, and he states that he had been a general in the Bengal Army.  Twenty years earlier, the 1851 census shows him as a lodger, once again in Hanover Square, and this time his occupation was 'Colonel: E.I.C. Service' which I presume refers to the East India Company.  His will also made mention of an Emily Catherine Oliver.  In 1881 this unmarried woman was living with Rev. Thomas Ralph Musselwhite and his wife, Mary Farman, at the West Mersea vicarage - Emily Catherine Oliver had been born in about 1831 in Madras, India, and the 1881 census calls her a 'cousin', presumably a cousin of Mary Farman, rather than Thomas Ralph Musselwhite who had been born in Devizes, Wiltshire, rather than Essex.  The LDS birth records for India only show up a Helen Grace Oliver, born 1831 to a Thomas and Lucy Oliver.

http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2013/01/the-will-of-sarah-oliver-saint-osyth.html











Wednesday, 7 November 2012

The Family of Edwin Grogan, son of Rev. William Grogan



This post follows on from the previous one....

Edwin Grogan married Isabella Courtenay, daughter of Robert Courtenay and Eliza Hudson, in Dublin in 1861.   The wedding was witnessed by Robert Courtenay and James Vance.   Robert Courtenay was the brother of our maternal 5 x great grandfather, Frederick Courtenay of 27 Wellington Street.  James Vance was married to Robert Courtenay's daughter, Mary Alicia Courtenay.

http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2012/03/the-courtenay-family-of-dublin-and.html

Edwin Grogan had been born to Elizabeth Beamish and Rev. William Grogan in Dublin in about 1832.  The children of Rev. William Grogan and Elizabeth Beamish may well have been illegitemate, since it seems that Rev. William Grogan was simultaneously married to Belinda or Ann Saunders when he had three children by Elizabeth Beamish.

Rev. William Grogan 1778 - 1858:

Rev. William Grogan was born in 1778 to Edward Grogan and Jane Grierson. Edward was the son of an earlier Edward Grogan of Ballytrain, Wexford.

Rev. William had a brother, John Grogan (1770 - 1832) , who was a barrister of 10 Harcourt Street, Dublin, and who married Sarah Medlicott (who died in 1819).  Amongst their children was Sir Edward Grogan M.P., a barrister and MP for Dublin who was created a baronet in 1859.    Another son of John Grogan and Sarah Medlicott was Rev. John Grogan who was married to Elizabeth Bourne, and who died in 12 Clyde Road, Dublin in 1899.  His widow, Elizabeth, and their unmarried children were living at 21 Clyde Road in 1911 - this property was later owned by the children of our great-great grandmother, Isabella Jones, who was related through marriage to the Grogan family.  Elizabeth Grogan was still living here in 1922 when she died.
http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2013/08/rev-john-grogan-and-lizzie-bourne.html

http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2013/05/the-grogan-family-of-dublin-westmeath.html

The Rev. William Grogan had been born to Edward and Jane Grogan in 1778.
 He married Belinda Saunders(sometimes named as Anne Saunders), the third daughter of Richard Saunders and Ann Parker of Newtown Saunders, in 1809.  The same year he bought Slaney Park, Baltinglass, from her brother, Owen Saunders, whose seat was Newtown Saunders near Baltinglass.


(NB:  I had originally thought that the eldest daughter of Rev. William Grogan and Ann Saunders was Mary Grogan, who must have been born circa 1809/1810, and who died in 1849.  Mary Grogan married a Trinity College graduate, Rev. John Caldwell, 1788 - 18th January 1851.   This was following-on from genealogical information sent to me by a descendant of Rev. John Caldwell. However, I have recently uncovered the marriage announcement of Rev. John Caldwell in 'Saunders Newsletter' of 30th August 1819, which confirms that Rev.John Caldwell of Carlow married Miss Mary GORE of Slaney Park, Wicklow.)

The eldest daughter of Rev. William Grogan and Ann or Belinda Saunders of Slaney Park was Anna Grogan who married the Dublin doctor Robert James Graves on 18th August 1829. Robert James Graves  M.D. of Harcourt Street, son of Rev. Richard Graves of Trinity College and of Eliza Mary Drought, was the King's Professor of the Institute of Medicine, reknowned for modernising the treatment of fevers.
Robert James Graves and Anne Grogan had two sons, Rev. Richard Drought Graves born 8th May 1831 in Harcourt Street, Colonel William Grogan Graves born 12th February 1834 at 9 Harcourt Street and later of Cloghan Castle, and three daughters, Florence Belinda Graves, born 6th April 1849 and who married Major Parsons, a Elizabeth Mary Graves who married Captain Thomas Priaulx St. George Armstrong in Dublin in 1860 - this wedding was witnessed by her uncle Richard Hastings Graves, Georgianna Arabella graves who married in 1857 Edward Balckburne, Q.C. of Rathfarnham Castle. Anna Graves, née Grogan, died in 1873.

The eldest son of Rev. William Grogan of Slaney Park was Edward Grogan, born 1810, a lawyer of Lincolns Inn - he entered Trinity College on October 20th 1827, aged 17. He died in Panama on 20th August 1855 after a few hours of illness on his way home, according to The Dublin Evening Mail, but the paper doesn't say where he'd been or why.

 A son of Rev. William Grogan and Ann Saunders was Captain William Grogan of Baltinglass who lived from 1812 till 1887.  He entered Trinity College on October 30th 1830, aged 17.  In the 1870s he was noted as Captain William Grogan of Baltinglass who owned 1,141 acres in neighbouring Westmeath.
In 1862, Captain William Grogan of the Wicklow Militia, eldest surviving son of Rev. William Grogan of Slaney Park, married Elizabeth Mary Hackblock, daughter of John Hackblock of Reigate, Surrey.  The couple had a son at 49 Devonshire St., Portland Place, London, on 2nd September 1863.  A son of Captain William Grogan, John Hubert Grogan, was born in Slaney Park on 18th September 1865 - John Hubert Grogan would marry, in July 1895, Evelyn Graham, the daughter of Robert Graham of St. Albans. John Hubert Grogan and his (second?) wife, named on the Irish census as Alice Evelyn Manners Grogan, were still living at Slaney Park, Wicklow, in 1911, along with John Hubert's widowed mother, Mary Elizabeth Grogan.  The son of John Hubert Grogan and Alice Graham was Robert James Grogan, born at Slaney Park on 20th September 1899.
Captain William Grogan's eldest son, who had been born in 1863, was William Edward Grogan who married, on 12th January 1888, Sabina, the second daughter of Hardy Eustace of Castlemore, Carlow - this family settled in Carlow and were living there in 1901 and 1911.  William Edward Grogan was sporty - from 1904 he was Master of the Carlow Hounds, and also played polo for Carlow.
The only daughter of Captain William Grogan and Elizabeth Mary Hackblock of Slaney Park was Elizabeth Mary Grogan who was born in Kilmurray, Co. Wicklow, on 23rd November 1869 and who died on 27th May 1889. ('Dublin Daily Express', 29th May 1889.)


The second surviving son of Rev. William Grogan of Slaney Park was John Grogan, born circa 1815, who entered Trinity College on October 18th 1830, aged 15. He was later Surgeon-Major of the 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards.  John Grogan MD married, in April 1865, Hannah Sophia Wheatcroft, the youngest daughter of the late David Wheatcroft of Wingfield Park, Derbyshire. The following year he died at the home of his brother-in-law at Brittas Castle, Thurles Tipperary, after a few day's illness in 1866.  The brother-in-law was Capt. William Hunter Knox of the 13th Light Dragoons who had married the youngest daughter of Rev. William Grogan, Georgiana Grogan on October 2nd 1838 in Dublin.
John Grogan had lived at Rathdangan, Wicklow, and his will was proved by his widow, Hannah Sophia Godber Grogan of 6 Charlemont Terrace, Cork.,

(Notes on Captain William Hunter Knox - born in 1808, he married Georgina Grogan, daughter of Rev. William Grogan of Slaney Park, on 2nd October 1838, and died at his seat of Brittas Castle, Thurles, Tipperary, on 9th August 1892,  At the time of the 1838 marriage, he was living at 30 Summerhill, Dublin City, as was his brother, Francis Blake Knox, whose address was also Summerhill when he married his first wife, Jane Knipe, in 1834.   In 1815, the Treble Almanack for Dublin listed a John Knox at 30 Summerhill, and this may be the father of William Hunter Knox, although, when Francis Blake Knox married his second wife, Elizabeth Mary Hutchison, in 1839, his father was named as Blake Knox.  Whatever the parentage of the brothers, William Hunter Knox and Francis Blake Knox, both descend from the family of Knox of Moyne, Castlerea, Co. Mayo,  one of whom, John Knox, settled at Summerhill, Dublin.  This John Knox had an aunt, Sarah Knox, who had married a Francis Blake, and this might be the origin of the name 'Blake' in conjunction with 'Knox'.
Captain William Hunter Knox and Georgina Grogan settled at Brittas Castle, and had four sons. John Hunter Knox was born on 25th June 1839 at 10 Harcourt Street, the residence of the Bourne/Grogan family.  John Hunter Knox, a military man, died in India on 24th October 1885, leaving a widow, Ada Kathleen Knox of Dundalk.    Another of the four sons of William Hunter Knox was William Grogan Knox, named after his maternal grandfather, Rev. William Grogan of Slaney Park - William Grogan Knox was a captain with the 25th Regiment;  he died on 28th June 1876 at Shorncliffe Camp, Cheriton, Kent, and was buried there.   A third son was Fitzroy Knox who lived at Brittas Castle and who died in Glasnevin on 3rd April 1911, leaving a widow, Mary Elizabeth Maud Knox.  This couple had a son in the military - Lt. Col. Hugh/Hubert Knox who was born on 14th September 1881 and who died in action at the Battle of the Somme on 13th October 1916.  His 1916 will was proved by a brother or cousin, William Grogan Knox.)


Rev. William Grogan lived at Slaney Park,Baltinglass, Wicklow, and had an address in Mountjoy Square, Dublin.  He owned extensive properties in Westmeath and Wicklow, approximately 455 acres.
Slaters Directory of 1846 noted Edward and William Grogan at Slaney Park, Carlow. (The property in Baltinglass straddled the Wicklow/Carlow border.)

Rev. William Grogan had three children by a Dublin-born woman Elizabeth Beamish, one of whom was Major Edwin Grogan.  The three children of this relationship were born in 1825, 1830 and 1832 in Ireland.   Their mother, Elizabeth Beamish, had been born in Dublin between 1802 and 1806, and would therefore have been young enough to be Rev. William Grogan's daughter.  His wife, Belinda Grogan, née Saunders, only died in 1869, which seems to confirm that Elizabeth Beamish was his mistress, and that the two never married.

An online list of subscribers/shareholders in the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, published in 1837, notes 'William Grogan, clerk, Slaney Park, Edinburgh'.

In 1841, the Irish-born Elizabeth Grogan, née Beamish, and her three children, Edwin, Elizabeth Jane and Henry, were living at 9 West Claremont, Edinburgh.
The oldest child, Henry William Grogan, had been born in Ireland in 1825;  Elizabeth/Eliza Grogan, had been born in Ireland in 1830;  Edwin Grogan had been born in Ireland in 1832.

A deed of 1853 (Vol, 15; Page 57) details the conveyance of an estate at Clonekilvant, Westmeath, owned by Rev. William Grogan who was selling or leasing it to Robert Courtenay.  This property was still owned by Rev. William in 1855, and William's son, Edwin, was living here when he married Robert Courtenay's daughter in 1861.  I accessed this deed at closing time in the Registry so only had time to scribble down the parties to the deed which refers to an earlier deed of dated 18th January 1850. The parties involved were:
1)  Rev. William Grogan of Slaney Park.
2) Elizabeth Beamish, Edinburgh, Spinster.
3) Henry William Grogan, ensign, 88th Regiment of Infantry, then stationed in Kinsale, ie: in 1850.
4) Edwin Grogan, then resident with the said Elizabeth Beamish of Edinburgh, an infant of the age of 17 years, ie: in 1850.
5) Robert Courtenay, Lower Gardiner Street, Solicitor.
The witnesses at the end of the 1853 agreement were Rev. William Grogan, Robert Courtenay, Robert Courtenay Junior, apprentice, and James Wolfe.

From the online archives of the register of the Edinburgh Academy:
'Grogan, Henry William 1835 - 1842, Cl. 1-7; b. 1825;  son of William Grogan, 9 West Claremont St; Capt. 88th Ft.;  Ensign 1847;  Lt. 1851;  Capt. 1854;  killed in the attack on the Redan, 1855.'

'Grogan, Edwin, 1842 - 5;  Cl. 1-3;  b. 1832;  son of William Grogan, 9 West Claremont St.; Lt. 6th Ft. and Capt. Stirling Mil.;  Ensign 1851;  Lt. 1852;  ret. 1857;  Lt. Stirling Mil. 1857;  Capt. 1862;  d.1974.'

In 1851, they were still at the same address in Edinburgh, and the mother, Elizabeth Grogan, stated that she was the wife of a landed proprietor.
Elizabeth's son, Henry William Grogan, joined the 88th Regiment (the Connaught Rangers) becoming ensign on 6th August 1847,  lieutenant on 26th December 1851, and finally captain on 29th  December 1854.  He died at Sebastopol during the attack on the Redan on 8th September 1855.

Elizabeth Grogan's ex-husband, Rev. William Grogan  (1777 - 1854), died on 2nd November 1854 aged 77.
His wife, Belinda Grogan, who had been born in 1789, died in Blackrock, South Dublin, in 1869, and was buried in Monkstown.
The brother of Belinda Grogan was Owen Saunders who had sold Slaney Park to William Grogan in 1809. Other properties associated with the Saunders family were Largay, Co. Cavan and Ballinderry, Co. Tipperary.
(Other records of the family of Richard Saunders of Newtown Saunders  - In February 1836, Edward Synge of Cork married Margaret Jemima, the youngest daughter of the late Owen Saunders, formerly of Newtown Saunders, Wicklow, but then of Ballinderry, Tipperary.    In August 1863 the death occurred in Borrisokane of Ellen, the widow of the late Thomas Sadleir, JP of Ballinderry and Castletown, Tipperary,  Ellen was the eldest daughter of Owen Saunders of Ballinderry and Largay, Cavan, and sister of Lady Synge. Their brothers, also the sons of Owen Saunders, were Henry Owen Saunders of Greyfort and Largay and Richard Saunders of Hawley House, Sutton-at-Hone, and of Largay who died aged 83 on 6th November 1881.  This Richard had married Jane the widow of Richard Leigh of Hawley House in August 1863.)

A deed (739-391-503726) which was, oddly, dated 12th October 1810, seems to have been drawn up between Rev. William Grogan and Owen Saunders, the brother of Ann and Belinda, two of William Grogan's wives.  I say oddly, since it seems to be a marriage settlement for Belinda and William Grogan. William had married Belinda's sister in 1809 and had several children with her, before he 'married' Elizabeth Beamish in the early 1830s.  Perhaps I wrote the date of the deed down incorrectly.
This deed recited an earlier agreement, dated 29th July 1797, between Richard Saunders, then of Youghal, and Owen Saunders, then of Ballinderry, Tipperary, who was noted as the eldest son and heir apparent of Richard.  Other parties were Rev. Henry Wynne of Killucan, Westmeath, Robert Wynne of Clonsilla, Dublin, Rev. Richard Wynne of Dublin and William Wynne of Dublin.  (Richard's wife was a member of the same Wynne family.)   In order to make provision for the younger children of Richard Saunders, Richard and Owen Saunders transferred lands in Ballinderry and Wicklow to Richard and William Wynne, in trust, in order to raise £9000 for the younger children.  Upon the wedding of Bellinda Saunders, one of the younger children, with Rev. William Grogan (and I'm unsure of the date here), a sum of £1,750 was paid to Rev. William Grogan, and it was confirmed that a portion of the £9000, held in trust, was to go to Belinda.  The witnesses to this were a (possibly) George Grogan (this was a squiggle) of something like Colledge, Alelery, Kildare, and William Grogan.

By 1861 his mistress, Elizabeth Beamish, and her family had moved to East Villa, Dick Place, Edinburgh and Elizabeth stated that she was now the 'widow' of a landowner. (Rev. William Grogan had died in 1854) She stated on the census that she had been born in Dublin in 1802 - earlier she had given a date of birth of 1806.
Her son, Edwin Grogan, joined the Stirlingshire Militia.  Records of his service survive - in 1858, Edwin Grogan, gentleman, who was previously a lieutenant in the 6th Regiment of Foot, was appointed lieutenant in the Sterlingshire regiment.  On 17th May 1862 he was appointed Captain in the 90th or Sterlingshire Regiment, Highland Borderers, Light Infantry.  On 1st February 1873, he was granted the Honorary Rank of Major.

Edwin married Isabella Courtenay, the daughter of Robert Courtenay, solicitor, and Eliza Hudson,  in Dublin in 1861.  Robert Courtenay was the brother of our 5 x great grandfather, Frederick Courtenay of 27 Wellington Street.  A marriage notice in the Limerick Chronicle noted that Isabella Courtenay was of Upper Gloucester Street and that the groom, Edwin Grogan, was of Clonekilvant, Westmeath.   A quick browse through Griffiths Valuation for 1855 confirms that Edwin's father, Rev. William Grogan, owned 25 acres of farmland in Clonickilvant.  The marriage certificate of 1861 confirmed that Edwin's father was a clerk in holy orders.

Edwin's sister, Elizabeth Jane Grogan, married Isabella Courtenay's brother ,the widower William Courtenay of Arklow and Gloucester Street, on 24th March 1863 in Rathfarnham and their daughter, Mary Isabella Courtenay, would marry Rev. Gerald King Moriarty in 1896 in Co. Louth. (The marriage of Mary Isabella Courtenay, daughter of gentleman William Courtenay of Rathcoole House, Dunleer, Co. Louth, married Rev. Gerald King Moriarty of Kilcronaghan Rectory, Tobermore, Co. Derry, son of Rev. Matthew Trant Moriarty, on 9th April 1896;  this was witnessed by George G. Moriarty and William Courtenay Junior, the son of the widowed William Courtenay.)

In the Registry of Deeds, Henrietta Street, I came across two deeds pertaining to Elizabeth Jane Grogan, in which her inheritance was settled.  Both deeds bore the date March 23rd 1863, the day before her marriage to William Courtenay of Woodmount, Wicklow.  (Deeds 1863-12-46 and 1863-12-47).  The first of these deeds was the marriage settlement itself - the parties named were William Courtenay of Woodmount, Eliza Jane Grogan of Garville Place, Rathgar,  Edwin Grogan, Captain in the Stirling Militia, and Henry Shepard of Oatlands, Wicklow, who was a landowner there and probably a friend of the family.  This marriage settlement recited an earlier deed of 19th January 1850, whereby Elizabeth Jane Grogan's father, Rev. William Grogan, promised a sum of £5000, along with land at Friarstown, Wicklow, to his daughter at the time of her marriage, the money and land to be held until then in trust by her brother, Edwin Grogan, and by Henry Shepard of Oatlands. Elizabeth Jane's mother, Elizabeth Beamish, was also named as a party to this agreement.
The second deed ensured the tranferral of this land etc. to Elizabeth Jane Grogan in March 1863, and the parties to this deed were named as Elizabeth Beamish of Garville Place, Elizabeth Jane Grogan, also of Garville Place, William Courtenay of Woodmount, Edwin Grogan, and Henry Shepard of Oatlands.

William Courtenay and Elizabeth Jane Grogan had Elizabeth Courtenay on 6th August 1865, Michael Hudson Courtenay, born 3rd April 1867 at Woodmount, Avoca, and Mary Isabella Courtenay born 31st March 1869 at Woodmount.

Edwin Grogan's mother, Elizabeth Grogan or Beamish, died at 183 Garville Place, Rathgar, on 19th August 1875, and the sole beneficiary was her son, Edwin Grogan.  (A headstone in Mount Jerome commemorates Elizabeth Grogan who died in 1905 and who shares a plot with her granddaughter, Margaret Urquhart Grogan, who died in 1922.  Margaret Urquhart Grogan was the daughter of Edwin Grogan.  Presumably the 1905 date for Elizabeth Grogan has been transcribed erroneously.)

 Edwin Grogan and Isabella Courtenay only had one daughter, Isabella Grogan. On 16th February 1884 in St. John's, Monkstown, Isabella Grogan of 23 Royal Terrace, Kingstown, married solicitor Robert Courtenay Vance of 57 Blessington Street, the son of Dr.James Vance and Mary Alicia Courtenay, in Dublin in 1884.   The 1884 wedding was witnessed by William Courtenay and somebody Martelli.  Dr. James Vance, apothecary of 10 Suffolk Street, had witnessed Edwin Grogan and Isabella Courtenay's 1861 wedding;
Our great-great grandmother, Isabella Jones, daughter of Emily Courtenay of Wellington Street, would later buy 55 and 56 Blessington Street from Robert Courtenay Vance.

http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/p/links-to-courtenay-and-moore-families_28.html

Edwin Grogan was involved in politics somehow...from The Irish Times, 29th September 1865:  'County of Dublin Revisions:  Trev. James Griffith, Rathgar Road, and Edwin Grogan, Garville Place, were retained, notwithstanding Liberal objections.' (Revision of Parliamentary Register.)

In November 1867, Major Grogan was stationed in Malta.

Edwin's wife, Isabella Courtenay, died at DeVere Terrace, Rathgar, Co. Dublin, on 14th April 1862 (from 'Freeman's Journal', 19th April 1862),  and he married subsequently Agnes Emma Warner on 5th April 1873 in Rathmines.  Once again he confirms that his father was a clerk in holy orders.  Edwin's address was 138 Rathgar Road, and he was a Major in the Sterlingshire Militia.     Agnes Emma Warner lived at Grosvenor Square, Rathmines, and was the daughter of a captain in the Indian Navy, Robert Edward Warner.   She had been born in Kensington, London, on 21st December 1850 to Robert Edward Warner and Margaret Urquhart.  The 'Cork Constitution' of 8th April 1873 reported that the bride's brother-in-law, Rev. Charles Tyner, had carried out the ceremony.   Agnes Warner's mother, Margaret, widow of the late Captain Robert Edward Warner of the Honorable East India Company's Naval Service, died on 21st July 1863 at Ferrybank, Arklow, Co. Wicklow.  Three weeks later, on 5th August 1863, her 11-year-old son, Robert Edward Warner, also died there, and was noted as the couple's only son.

Children of this second marriage were:
a) Margaret Urquhart Grogan born at 138 Rathgar Road on 20th October 1874. She was known as Daisy Grogan in 1901; a refuge worker, she died on 2nd May 1922, aged 44, at 2 Landsdowne Gardens and was buried in Mount Jerome alongside her grandmother Elizabeth Grogan who died in 1875.
b) Agnes Irene Grogan was born at 138 Rathgar Road on 13th September 1876. On 11th October 1902 in the Mariners' Church in Kingstown, she married, Lt. James Alexander Armstrong of the Enniskilling Fusiliers, the son of gentleman William Watkins Armstrong; the witnesses were Annie A. Symes and the bride's sister, Katherine Mary Edwin Grogan.
c)  Elizabeth Warner Grogan who was born at 138 Rathgar Road on 28th August 1878.
d) Henry William Grogan, born on 19th September 1880 at 23 Royal Terrace, Kingstown,but he died the same year.
e) Katherine Mary Edwin Grogan, known as Winnie, was born on 20th August 1882. Katherine Mary Edwin Grogan of 23 Royal Terrace married, on 28th July 1908 in St John's, Monkstown, John Edward de Burgh Galwey, an engineer of 3 Landsdowne Gardens, the son of engineer Charles Richard Galwey. This was witnessed by Robert Courtenay Vance and Janet M. Galwey. Robert Courtenay Vance was the son-in-law of Edwin Grogan.   ('The Ecclesiastical Gazette' of 23rd February 1870 announced the wedding of John Edward de Burgh Galwey's parents in Abbeyleix on 13th February 1879 - Charles Richard Galwey, son of the Archdeacon of Derry, married Janet Mary, third daughter of Horace Uniacke Townsend of Rathoyle, Queen's Co.  Later the couple's 2-month-old son, Charles Uniacke Townsend Galwey, died on 29th June 1872 in Tramore, Co. Waterford. On 12th July 1894 in Blackrock, Co. Dublin, the death occirred of Lilian Mary Isabel Galwey, the eldest daughter of the late Charles Richard Galwey, and sister of John Edward de Burgh Galwey.)

Edwin Grogan, of 23 Royal Terrace West, Kingstown, Co. Dublin, died 17th April 1882.
The Irish Times of January 17th 1883 mentioned that a £100 contribution had been made to Monkstown Hospital so that a memorial tablet might be put up for the late Major Grogan.

In 1901 his widow, Agnes Emma Grogan,  and her unmarried daughters were living at 23 Royal Terrace West, Kingstown/DunLaoghaire.  Agnes Emma, still resident at 23 Royal Terrace, died on 12th September 1911 but at Portland Road,  Bray, Co. Wicklow.  Her will was administered by her unmarried daughter, Margaret Urquhart Grogan, and by her daughter, Katherine May Edwin Galwey.

From The Irish Times of Saturday October 18th 1902:  'Armstrong and Grogan - October 11th, by special licence, at the Mariner's Church, Kingstown,  J.A. Armstrong, Lieutenant 1st Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, to Irene, daughter of the late Major E. Grogan and Mrs. Grogan, 25 Royal Terrace, Kingstown,'

From the Irish Times, June 27th 1908:  'The marriage arranged between John de Burgh Galwey, A.M.I.C.E.I. of 3 Lansdowne Gardens, Dublin, and Katherine Mary Edwin (Winnie) youngest daughter of the late Major Edwin Grogan and Mrs. Grogan, 23 Royal Terrace, Kingstown, will take place very quietly at the end of July.'

From the Irish Times, August 8th 1908:  'July 29 at St. John's, Monkstown...John de Burgh Galwey, son of the late Charles Knox Galwey, to Winnie, youngest daughter of the late Major Edwin Grogan.'

Sunday, 4 November 2012

More Courtenay marriages...

This post concerns further details on Courtenay intermarriages. I'll add to it if I find more.

During a recent visit to the Registry of Deeds in Henrietta Street, Dublin, I came across a deed of assignment dated 24th November 1890.
This concerned the sale of numbers 55 and 56 Blessington Street.  Our maternal great-great grandmother, Isabella Jones, was buying the property - the deed named her as Isabella Jones, of 9 Middle Mountjoy Street, wife of Charles Jones.  Charles and Isabella Jones lived at 56 Blessington Street from 1890.
Isabella was buying the property from two people - Caroline Frances Vance of 2 Upper Beechwood Avenue, and Robert Courtenay Vance of 56 Dawson Street.
On the same day, a separate deed detailed the mortgage of £300 which she acquired from the Dublin Mutual Benefit Building Society.  This was one of the earliest properties which she took on;  by the time of her death in 1940, she owned about thirty separate houses around the city.  We had  assumed that she had been compelled to turn to property development following the death of her husband in 1893, but she had evidently caught the property bug much earlier than that.

Isabella was the daughter of Emily Courtenay, and the granddaughter of Frederick and Mary Courtenay who lived at 27 Wellington St, as did her great-uncle, Francis Courtenay, who was admitted to the Freemen of Dublin by birth, being the son of Thomas Courtenay, Shearman.  Another individual admitted to the Freemen of Dublin was Robert Courtenay Junior 22 of Ranelagh Road, admitted as a grandson of the same Thomas Courtenay, Shearman;  Robert was the son of Robert Courtenay Senior, solicitor of Lower Gardiner Street.  Also admitted, later, as a grandson of Thomas Courtenay, Shearman, was his grandson, Thomas Courtenay of the Royal Hospital, who was the son of Frederick Courtenay of 27 Wellington Street and, therefore, an uncle of our Isabella Jones who bought 55 and 56 Blessington St from Robert Courtenay Vance.

 I wondered if Robert Courtenay Vance, the vendor of 55 and 56 Blessington Street was a relation of our Isabella Jones.  And, yes, he was....

The Vance Family:
Originally French, the Vance family settled first in Scotland before moving to settle in Ireland - the first of the Vance family to come over was a clergyman, Rev. John Vauss or Vans, who had been appointed to the parish of Kilmacrenan, Donegal in about 1617 and who died in about 1661 or 1662;  his grandson, John Vance, later moved further south and settled in Coagh, Co. Tyrone, having received a grant of land there under the Act of Settlement.  There he built a brewery, a distillery, a malthouse and various other properties.

John Vance of Coagh married a Miss Williamson and had seven children.

One of his daughters married Humphrey Bell of Bellmount near Stewartstown, Co. Tyrone, while another married a Mr. Smith of Dungannon.   Of great interest was a third daughter who married Andrew Jackson of Magherafelt - this couple emigrated to America and were the parents of Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States.  

The four sons of John Vance of Coagh were John, James, William and Andrew.   John Vance left his Coagh property to his second son, James Vance.
James Vance of Coagh, also had a son, James Vance, who settled in Dublin and who married Martha Sherrard in St. Lukes on  14 March 1772.  James Vance was an alderman and high sheriff of the city; he also served as Lord Mayor of Dublin in 1805 - 6.   One of Alderman Vance's daughters married Mountiford John Hay of Dublin and had a daughter, Pauline Ivy Sterling who married Colonel Maude of Lucknow; another daughter of Alderman James Vance and Martha Sherrard married a solicitor, George O'Brien.
Miss Vance and George O'Brien had a daughter who married Rev. Ratcliffe of Donard, Co. Wicklow, and another -Eliza O'Brien of Hardwick Street -  who married Every Carmichael of 18 Herbert Place on 2nd September 1836;  the son of George O'Brien was named as James Vance O'Brien,  a solicitor of Dublin.
The daughter of Every or Evory Carmichael and Eliza O'Brien was Eveline Cecilia Carmichael who married, on 28th October 1872, Rev. Abraham Herbert Orper-Palmer of Kenmare - she died on 5th November 1923 at High Park, Kiltegan.

William Vance, the son of James of Coagh, settled as a merchant in Dublin where he married a Miss Gormley and where he died in 1801.  His three sons were the Dublin solicitor, James Vance, the soldier Richard Vance, and John Vance.

Joseph Vance and Miss Usher:
A son of  James Vance and Miss Williamson of Coagh was Joseph Vance, a distiller who married a Miss Usher of Armagh. Joseph Vance, distiller, died in 1784 in Cookstown, leaving a family of six, the eldest son being James Vance of Summerhill,  Dublin, who married Mary Anne Shaw.   It was this Dublin branch of the family which married into our own Dublin Courtenay family.
Joseph Vance, distiller, had another son, John Vance, whose son was the George Washington Vance who provided the genealogical material for the 1860 Vance book written by a relation William Balbirnie, 'An Account, Historical and Genealogical, From the Earliest Days Till the Present Time, of the family of Vance in Ireland, Vans in Scotland, anciently Vaux in Scotland and England, and originally De Vaux in France'.  I accessed a copy of the book online via Internet Archive Texts.

James Vance of Summerhill, Dublin, and Mary Ann Shaw:
Dr. James Vance of Summerhill, Dublin, the son of Joseph Vance, distiller, married Mary Ann Shaw in 1799 in St. James, Dublin. 

Following James Vance Senior's death, his property of 51 Summerhill, including its contents, was put up for auction by his son, Dr. James Vance of 8 Suffolk Street in October 1831.  He also put up for lease a new house at 27 Hardwicke Street and a house at 65 Upper Dorset Street.  Enquiries were to be directed to 8 Suffolk Street, 35 Nassau Street or to the auctioneers. ('Dublin Evening Mail', 24th October 1831.)
'Saunders Newsletter' of 14th October 1830 had run an advertisement whereby James Vance announced that he had just bought 8, Suffolk Street,  the house and establishment of the late Mr. McAlpine.  Later he operated from 10 Suffolk Street.

James Vance of 51 Summerhill, the eldest son of Joseph Vance of Cookstown and husband of Mary Anne Shaw, had six sons and four daughters:

1)  Joseph Vance who died aged 21 at Summerhill in July 1831.

2)  William Shaw Vance - a solicitor,  William Shaw Vance, son of James Vance and Mary Anne Shaw of Summerhill, married Margaret Conroy,the eldest daughter of  John Conroy of Upper Dorset Street, in St. Mary's in October 1837;  at the time of the marriage in 1837, William Shaw Vance was living at Hardwicke Street but subseuqently lived at 37 Upper Dorset Street.
Their children were  John Vance born in June 1843, Thomas Shaw Vance born December 1844, Margaret Jane McDowell Vance born January 1846 and William Shaw Vance Junior born March 1848.
The older William Shaw Vance, solicitor of Upper Dorset Street, died in Kilkenny of typhus on 31st September 1847.  This was the year of the Great Famine and typhus was rife throughout the country.

3) Thomas Shaw Vance. Born in Summerhill in 1801, he lived in Nassau Street. Thomas Shaw Vance died at 20 Nassau Street, Dublin,  in September 1852.  In the 1847 street directory he was noted there as 'Vance, Thomas,  foreign perfumery,  hosiery,  and glove warehouse.'

4) James Vance, the apothecary of 10 Suffolk Street, who married our Mary Alicia Courtenay in 1841.  James Vance, apothecary of 10 Suffolk Street, died on 12th January 1875 - his will was proved by his brother, Richard Ephraim Vance of 51 Blessington Street, and by his son, Robert Courtenay Vance, solicitor of Blessington Street.   A daughter was Eliza Courtenay Vance who died aged 44 on 14th June 1896 - her headstone in Mount Jerome noted her as the daughter of the late James Vance of Summer Hill.

5)  Richard Ephraim Vance (8th June 1819 - 28th September 1880) who lived with his brother, James Vance, at 10 Suffolk Street.  He was noted at Suffolk Street in 1847;  later, the Voters list for Dublin, compiled in 1865, noted James Vance and Richard Ephraim Vance at the same address in Suffolk Street, but when he died on 28th September 1880, he was living at 51 Blessington Street.  His will was administered by his nephew, the solicitor, Robert Courtenay Vance of 34 Kildare Street.  In 1869,  properties belonging to Richard Ephraim Vance (and also to Paul Askin, Emer and Susanna Harte, and to Edward Richard Carolin) were put up for sale in the Encumbered Estates Court.  The properties concerned were plots of building ground on the North Strand and a house at 29 Lower Abbey Street.
In December 1852, the Encumbered Estates Court also put up for sale the estate of Margaret Vance, the administratrix of William Shaw Vance and Richard Ephraim Vance, the owners.  The Rev. John George Vance was also noted as an owner;  the petitioner was James Vance, and the properties concerned were Numbers 3 and 8, Hardwicke Street.

6)  Rev. John George Vance of Manchester, who was earlier the rector of St. Marys, Dublin, and who presided there at the 1837 wedding of his brother, William Shaw Vance.  He was born 24th April 1814 and entered the church.  In 1841 he was living at Newchapel Glebe, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary ('Dublin Evening Packet,' 8th June 1841) but later served for 24 years as the rector of St. Michael's in Manchester.   'The Dublin Evening Mail' of 22nd April 1859 advertised for a curate for a church in Manchester - applications were to be made to brother James Vance of 10 Suffolk Street.
He died on 26th July 1868 at his residence, Summer Villas, Manchester, was buried in the Vance plot at Mount Jerome, Dublin.

7) Anna Maria Vance, eldest daughter of James Vance of Summerhill, died at Mountpleasant Square on 21st November 1847. ('Dublin Evening Post', 27th November 1847.)

8) Margaret Vance of 57 Harcourt Street married Dr. David Brereton of TCD and lived subsequently at 12 York Street.

9)  Jane Vance, died aged 17 at Summerhill in February 1826.

10) The youngest daughter of James Vance of Summerhill was Susanna Vance who was born on 1st February 1811 and who died on 26th May 1866 at Merrion Square North.   

The son of James Vance and Mary Ann Shaw, Dr. James Vance, an apothecary of 10 Suffolk St., married Mary Alicia Courtenay/Courtney in St. Thomas, Dublin, on 24th August 1841.  The wedding was witnessed by his brother, William Shaw Vance.
 Mary Alicia Vance of 10 Suffolk Street was mentioned as a depositor of the Cuffe Street Savings Bank in 1851.
On 13th September 1851, Mrs. Maria Alicia Vance, the wife of Dr. James Vance of Suffolk Street, died following an accidental fall from her bedroom window just before breakfast. She was 39 and left four children.  Suffering from illness, she had recently returned from a holiday in Killarney which had been intended to improve her health.

The children of James Vance and Mary Alicia Courtenay of 10 Suffolk St, Dublin,were:

1)  James Vance MD of Rathdrum, Wicklow, who married Caroline Frances Martin, the daughter of a clergyman who emigrated to Canada later, Nicholas Columbine Martin, the son of Captain Nicholas Martin and Martha Harris, and the grandson of Rev. James Martin, of Clare and Frances Janns.  

The wedding of James Vance MD and Caroline Frances Martin occurred on October 6th 1870 in Carndonagh, Co. Donegal, where the bride's father was the rector. The rector was assisted by a relation, Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty.
(Later, a second member of the Courtenay family married into this same Martin family - in London in 1900, Sabina Courtenay, the daughter of Thomas Courtenay of the Royal Kilmainham Hospital, and granddaughter of Frederick Courtenay of Wellington Street, married Frederick Temple Martin, the son of Temple Chevallier Martin and Elizabeth Mary Parkyn;  Temple Chevallier Martin was a grandson of Rev. James Martin and Frances Janns of Co. Clare.)
Amongst the children of Dr. James Vance of Rathdrum and Caroline Frances were James born 1871, Henry Nicholas Martin Vance born 1872, Richard Ephraim Vance born 1874 and Mary Alicia Courtenay Vance born 1875.    A daughter, Ethel Caroline Vance, was born to the couple in Dublin at 57 Harcourt Street in 1884.
The widowed Caroline Frances Vance was one of the vendors of 55 and 56 Blessington Street in 1890, as was her brother-in-law, Robert Courtenay Vance.  They sold the properties to their 2nd cousin, Isabella Jones.
James Vance, the physician and brother of Robert Courtenay Vance, died at 57 Harcourt Street on 7th August 1885;  probate was to his widow, Caroline Frances Vance of 57 Harcourt Street.


2) Robert Courtenay Vance, solicitor. Born circa 1849, on 16th February 1884 Robert Courtenay Vance of 57 Blessington Street, married Isabella Grogan of 23 Royal Terrace, Kingstown, who had been born in Dublin in 1862 to Edwin Grogan and Isabella Courtenay, Isabella Courtenay being the daughter of Robert Courtenay and Eliza Hudson.
Given that Robert Courtenay Vance's mother, Mary Alicia Courtenay was the sister of Isabella Grogan's mother, Isabella Courtenay, then the bride and groom were first cousins. Our Isabella Jones was, therefore, second cousin to both Robert Courtenay Vance and his to his wife Isabella Grogan.  The witnesses to the wedding of Robert Courtenay Vance and Isabella Grogan were the groom's uncle, William Courtenay who had married  Elizabeth Jane Grogan, the aunt of Isabella Grogan, and also a C. Martelli.

At one stage, Robert Courtenay Vance  had offices, or perhaps lived, at 113 Stephens Green, which was immediately adjacent to Isabella and Charles Jones' showrooms.

Robert Courtenay Vance, solicitor of 15 Brookfield Terrace, Anglesea Road, Donnybrook, Co Dublin, died on 2nd November 1909 aged 60.  His widow, Isabella Vance, died on 17th February 1932 and was buried alongside her late husband in Mount Jerome.

3) William John Vance,

4) Eliza Courtenay Vance.

5) Joseph Vance who died in infancy.

6) Richard Ephraim Vance - on 22nd December 1857, Richard Ephraim Vance of 10 Suffolk Street was admitted to the Freemen of Dublin, being the son of James Vance Junior, who had been admitted himself in Michaelmas 1791.


According to a private contributor to the LDS site, the bride, Mary Alicia Courtney, had been born in Mallow, Co. Cork, in 1809 to a solicitor named either Thomas or Robert Courtenay and to his wife, Sarah. However, I recently accessed a deed (1841-17-173) in the Registry of Deeds which detailed the marriage settlement of James Vance and Mary Alicia Courtenay.  The deed confirms that Mary Alicia was living at Lower Gardiner Street at the time of her marriage, and this seems to confirm that she was the daughter of Robert Courtenay, solicitor, and Eliza Hudson who were living in Lr Gardiner Street at this time. Robert Courtenay was the son of Thomas Courtenay, Shearman, who was admitted to the Freedom of Dublin in 1789.  Robert Courtenay was the brother of our immediate maternal ancestor, the veterinary surgeon Frederick Courtenay.
Another of the witnesses to the wedding in 1841 was Joshua Pasley, and a son of Robert Courtenay and Eliza Hudson was christened as Joshua Pasley Courtenay.  An earlier Joshua Pasley was closely involved with the phlanthropist, Thomas Pleasants (his cousin), who had founded the Stove Tenters House in the Liberties in 1814, which provided indoor facilities for the drying of woollens and other fabrics in poor weather;  prior to the foundation of the Stove Tenters House, those involved in fabric manufacture in the Liberties area of the city would find themselves destitute during the winter or during spells of inclement weather.  Thomas Pleasants and his cousin, Joshua Pasley, were also involved with the foundation of the Meath Hospital. Was this the Joshua Pasley who witnessed Mary Alicia Courtenay's wedding, or was it a younger relation of his? Joshua Pasley Courtenay,  probably named after Joshua Pasley, had been born in about 1836 to Robert Courtenay and Eliza Hudson.


Timeline of these intermarriages (very difficult to visualise!):

1)  Dr. James Vance of Dublin married Mary Alicia Courtenay/Courtney in 1841 in Dublin.  A marriage deed of 1840, drawn up a year before her marriage to James Vance, gave an address of Lower Gardiner Street for Mary Alicia Courtenay, which confirms that she was the daughter of Robert Courtenay, solicitor of Lower Gardiner Street, and of his wife, Eliza Hudson.

2)   A second daughter of Robert Courtenay and Eliza Hudson,  Isabella Courtenay, married Edwin Grogan in Dublin in 1861.   The wedding was witnessed by Robert Courtenay and James Vance.  James Vance was Isabella's brother-in-law, married to her older sister, Mary Alicia Courtenay.

3)  In 1863, the son of solicitor Robert Courtenay and of Eliza Hudson, William Courtenay, married Elizabeth Jane Grogan of Garville Place, Rathgar, who was the sister of Edwin Grogan.

4)  Isabella Grogan, the daughter of Edwin Grogan and Isabella Courtenay, married Robert Courtenay Vance, the son of James Vance and Mary Alicia Courtenay, in Dublin in 1884.

5)  Mary Isabella Courtenay, the daughter of William Courtenay and Elizabeth Jane Grogan, married Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty, in 1896.  She was the cousin of Isabella Grogan.

From The Belfast Newsletter - "Moriarty-Courtenay  -  At the Parish Church, Dunleer, by the Rev. M.F. Moriarty AB, the brother of the bridegroom, Rector of Castledawson, Diocese of Derry, assisted by the Rev. H. Kelly, MA, Rector of the parish, the Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty AM, Rector of Kilcronoghan, Diocese of Derry,  youngest son of the late Rev. M.J. Moriarty, AB, of St. Anne's and Rector of Killaghter, Diocese of Raphoe, to Mary J.(sic.), only daughter of William Courtenay, D.L., Rathcoole Park, Co. Louth and Crosswaithe Park, Co. Dublin."

Notes on Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty:  Gerald descended from Maurice Moriarty of Dingle, Co. Kerry, whose son was Denis Moriarty (1784 - 1839) of Dingle.  Denis Moriarty had three sons, Rev. Denis Moriarty of Castleisland, Rev. Thomas Moriarty of Ventry and Tralee, and Rev. Matthew Trant Moriarty of Ventry, Matthew being the father of Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty.
The Moriarty family were an Irish-speaking Catholic family of Dingle, who converted to Protestantism at some stage in the early 19th century.  Rev.Thomas Moriarty (1812 - 1894), son of Denis, entered the church, and was stationed at the Protestant stronghold of Ventry, five miles west of Dingle, where he was a prominent member of the movement to convert the local Irish-speaking Catholics to the Church of Ireland, an endeavour which was greeted with much derision by the local population.  Rev. Thomas Moriarty married Matilda Bailey - the couple had Matilda, Margaret, Eliza, Emily, Katherine, Mary, Thomas, John B., Matthew and Robert.

Rev. Matthew Trant Moriarty (1821 - 9th March1888), son of Denis Moriarty of Dingle, and who was the father of Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty, was noted in 1851 as the agent for Lloyds, resident in Ventry.  He married Sarah King of Cork city, the third daughter of the late Joseph King, and niece of Rev. Richard King of Wexford, in St. Anne's, Shandon, Cork, on 10th July 1845.  Sarah King's brother was Rev. Joseph King who married Lucy Jane Edgeworth, widow of George Peacocke of Longford, in December 1854.  A sister was Charlotte, youngest daughter of Joseph King, who married in Dingle in October 1852, a son of the Rev. James Goodman of Skibbereen.

The children of Rev. Matthew Trant Moriarty and Sarah King were born at Rahinane, Ventry:
1)  Robert Torrens Moriarty, born at Ventry in April 1849.  He died on 21st May 1915 at Derry, with probate to his brother, Rev. Matthew Francis Moriarty.  His will states that he had been 'late of Edenderry Rectory, Omagh, Co. Tyrone.'
2)  Rev. Matthew Francis Moriarty, born May 1851 at Rahinane, Ventry.
3) Rev. George Garibaldi Moriarty.
4) Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty, born circa 1863.

Sarah Moriarty, née King, died at 4 Victoria Terrace, Portstewart, Co. Derry, on 8th March 1894;  her son, Robert Torrens Moriarty of Derry,  was the executor of her will.

The children of Rev. Gerald Ivor King Moriarty and Mary Isabella Courtenay were Freda Bessie Moriarty, born circa 1897 in Derry;  Gerald Ruadh O'Neill Moriarty, born in Tyrone in 1900;  Iris Moira Courtenay Moriarty, born in Tyrone in 1903;  Denis Trant Florence Moriarty, born in Tyrone in 1907.



Sunday, 28 October 2012

Thomas Courtenay and Mary Brown, Royal Hospital, Kilmainham


Thomas Courtenay was the son of Frederick Courtenay and Mary Tuty of Dublin;  Frederick and Mary Courtenay were our great-great-great-great grandparents on our mother's side.
http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2012/03/the-courtenay-family-of-dublin-and.html

http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2012/10/the-children-of-frederick-and-mary.html


Sergeant Thomas Courtenay, was born in St. Andrews, Dublin, on 26th March 1824 (the date comes from the LDS website) - he married Mary Browne on 5th June 1859 in St. James' Catholic Church, Dublin.
The St. James' registers are currently free to view on the National Library of Ireland website, and I came across the marriage there.   Thomas Courtney was living at 7 Irwin Street, which is close to the military Royal Hospital, at the time of the marriage in 1859.  The register notes him as the son of Frederick Courtney and Mary Tuty (this could be Tute or Tutty).  Mary Brown gave the same address as the groom.  She was the daughter of Benjamin and Mary Browne.   The witnesses were both living at 13 Irwin Street - George Allen and Delia, whose family name was illegible to me.

Mary Browne had been born to Benjamin Browne and Mary Farrell and was baptised in St. James' on 22nd April 1841.   Her brother, Benjamin Browne, was baptised there on 6th March 1843.

Thomas Courtenay died at Royal Hospital, Kilmainham on March 20th 1895.

Thomas Courtenay, a labourer aged 18, joined the 8th Regiment of Foot in Dublin in 1842, and transferred to the 1st Battalion of the 60th Rifles on 2nd September 1844.  This regiment sailed for India in 1845 under the command of Lt.Col. Henry Dundas.  Thomas served during the Sikh War of 1848 - 9, and was severely wounded in action in Delhi on 18th July 1857 during the Siege of Delhi, losing his right arm close to the shoulder;  the wound was 'not aggravated by vice or intemperance.' In 1856 he had been promoted to Corporal and was finally discharged from duty, due to his injuries, in Chatham on 18th August 1858, having spent 15 years in the army, 12 of them in India where he served in the East Indies Lower and Upper Scinde, and in the Punjab from 15th October 1845 till 31sts December 1857.
At the time of his discharge he was wearing two good conduct rings, but had once been charged in a regimental court with drunkenness.  He had been present at the Siege and capture of Kooltan from 27th December 1848 till 22nd January 1849. at the Battle of Goojerat, and during the occupation of Attoch and Peshawar.
Following his discharge, he returned home to Dublin where he took up residence in The Royal Hospital, Kilmainham.

He married Mary Browne on 5th June 1859 in St. James' Catholic Church following his return to Dublin.

Thomas Courtenay was the same man who was admitted to the Freemen of Dublin on 16th July 1863, being the grandson of Thomas Courtenay, Shearmen, who had been admitted in 1789, although in the archives of the Dublin Freemen he was named as Thomas Frederick Courtenay.  Thomas (Frederick) Courtenay was a yeoman of the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham in 1863, and was named there on the Dublin Electoral Lists of 1865.  Thomas was the son of our direct ancestors, Frederick Courtenay and Mary Tuty of 27 Wellington Street.  We descend, therefore, directly from his sister, Emily Courtenay, who would marry John Lysaght Pennefather.

The Royal Hospital in Kilmainham had been founded as a home for retired military men,  and military members of the Hospital staff were provided with apartments for themselves and their families. Thomas's father, Frederick Courtenay, worked in the library of the Royal Hospital, before retiring circa 1851 as a pensioner to the Chelsea Hospital in London.

Thomas Courtenay and Mary Browne had at least 11 children together at the Royal Hospital, before they separated in about 1880.  Following the separation, Mary became ill with phthisis/tuberculosis, and died in her mid-forties in 1885.
The three youngest daughters - Adelaide, Sarah and Sabina Courtenay were sent off to school, the boys joined the army, a Courtenay family tradition, and the older daughters stayed home to care for their father, who died on 20th March 1895, and whose funeral was attended by Field-Marshall Lord Roberts who was Master of the Royal Hospital.  The informant for Thomas Courtenay,s death was his daughter, A. Courtenay, ie. Adelaide.

The children of Thomas Courtenay and Mary Browne:

1)  William Courtenay was baptised on 15th April 1860 at St.Mary's, Haddington Road. The sponsor at the baptism was a member of the Dwyer family, first name illegible to me.

On 19th March 1887 in the Dublin Registrar's office, William Courtenay, who was Protestant later, married  Emily Yorke.  In 1887 William was living at home in the Royal Hospital in Kilmainham and was working as a goods clerk in a private company.   The wedding witnesses were Thomas Courtenay and Elizabeth Sarah Yorke.
Emily Yorke had been born on 3rd January 1856 to a policeman, William Yorke, and to Eliza Courtney - her address at the time of her birth in 1856 was 27 Wellington St, the home of the Courtenay family; by 1887, the year of her marriage, she was living at 3 Avondale Road.  Eliza Courtney/Courtenay was a daughter of Frederick and Mary Courtenay of 27 Wellington Street, therefore William Courtenay and his wife, Emily Yorke, were first cousins.
http://alison-stewart.blogspot.ie/2012/10/the-children-of-frederick-and-mary.html

William Courtenay and Emily Yorke had four children in Dublin -

On 25th June 1891, twin sons, John and Victor Courtenay, were born at 2 Avondale Road, John at 12.10am and Victor at 12.50am.  Neither survived - John died after three minutes, and his brother, Victor, died five hours later.

Robert William Henry Courtenay was born on 27th May 1892 at 2 Avondale Road.  (William's sister, Adelaide, was living at 3 Avondale Road in 1900.)   On 26th May 1918 in Donnybrook Catholic Church, boilermaker Robert Courtenay of 3 Avondale Road, North Circular Road, Dublin, married Margaret Erving of 5 Warwick Terrace, Appian Way, Ranelagh, the daughter of a farmer John Erving. Robert's father, William Courtenay, was noted as a timekeeper.   The witnesses were George Yorke and Annie Agatha Gerity.  Robert Courtenay of 3 Avondale Road died of an ulcer in Drumcondra Hospital on 28th January 1931.


On 23rd April 1894, at 45 Avondale Road, William Courtenay and Eliza Yorke had Dorothy Mary Elizabeth Courtenay, who would later marry an antiques dealer, Erwin Arthur Stassen, a widower of 296b North Circular Road, the son of the late Philip Stassen, a maths professor.  Erwin Arthur Stassen (1883 - 1954) had earlier married Florence Emily Alexandra O'Farrell Doran in Dover in 1908, but she had died of cancer aged 62 on 7th June 1937 in St. Michael's, Drumcondra.  They had had a son, Bodo Phillip Stassen, in 1908 in Hampshire - he was boarding, aged only 3 years, in 1911 with the family of William and Fanny Windsor in Bournemouth, and was noted on the census return as being German.
Erwin Arthur Stassen had arrived in Ireland on 17th April 1929 and had been naturalised in the 1940s.
Dorothy Courtenay and the widowed Erwin Arthur Stassen married in All Saints Church on 16th September 1938, and this was witnessed by Nora Elizabeth Bell and John Bell.  John Bell was the bride's uncle, having married William Courtenay's sister, Sarah, while Nora was the adopted daughter of John Bell and Sarah Courtenay.  Dorothy Stassen, aged 55, died at 2 Avondale Road on 16th August 1949, while her husband Erwin died aged 71 at 2 Avondale Road on 1st July 1954. His son, Bodo, was there.

On 24th November 1897,  at 24 Hardwicke Street, William Courtenay and Emily York had Sylvia Eugenie Adelaide Courtenay.

William Courtenay and his family fell on hard times at the turn of the century, and the Dublin Workhouse Admission registers show the Courtenays spending time in the institution. The family was resident in the workhouse on and off throughout 1901, having previously lived in a variety of Dublin addresses, 21 Meath Street, 4 Maunsell Place, 25 Mountjoy Street and 24 Hardwicke Street. Emily's brother, George Yorke, a married house painter, also entered the workhouse in this era, having also lived at Mountjoy Street and 4 Maunsell Road, but he left on 21st March 1903.

Earlier, on 17th March 1900, William Courtenay joined the Royal Reserve Regiment for one year.  A married clerk, his address at the time was Beggar's Bush, and he was aged 40 years and 7 months. His records state that he had previously served with the 1st East Lancashire Regiment but no date was given for this. When his year's service was complete, on 16th March 1901, he stated that his wife, Emily, was living at 25 Hardwicke Street.
   
William and his wife, Emily, were living at 12 Broadstone Avenue, Dublin, in 1911;  William was an asylum attendant.  Also in the house was his younger brother, the widowed Thomas Courtenay, a musician. Thomas was present with his 18 year old son, Thomas, who had been born in India.  See below....

Emily Courtenay, née Yorke, died at 2 Avondale Road, North Circular Rd., Dublin, on 10th November 1933.  The death registration names her as the wife of a soldier.   William Courtenay, a widowed clerk of 2 Avondale Road, died aged 76 on 26th March 1936;  his son-in-law, Arthur Stassen, was the informant when he died.


2)  Mary Ellen Courtney of the Royal Hospital, was on 11th November 1861, and was baptised in St. James's on 21st November 1861 -  the sponsors were Patrick and Mary Ellen Dwyer.

3) Mary Eliza Courtenay was born on 26th May 1863 at the Royal Hospital and was baptised in St. James' on 2nd June 1863.  I presume her older sister, Mary Ellen, had died in infancy, since two sisters named 'Mary' would be unusual.  The sponsors at the baptism were Edward and Eliza Browne, possible relations of the baby's mother.

4) Thomas Courtenay was born 12th May 1865, and was baptised in St. James' on 22nd May 1865. The sponsors were Michael McQuaid and Esther Gilmore. Thomas was a musician with the military and was posted to Lucknow, Bengal, where he married in Chunar, on 4th November 1891,  Ann McDonald, the daughter of Henry McDonald.   The marriage record records that Thomas was the son of Thomas Courtenay, and that he had been born in  1865.   Ann had been born in 1872.   Thomas Courtenay was noted as a sergeant with the East Lancashire Regiment.
Their eldest son, Cyrill Courtenay, was born on 14th November 1892 in Lucknow, baptised on 16th November, died on 17th November, and finally was buried in Lucknow on 18th November 1892.
Their second and only son, Thomas Courtenay, was born in Lucknow, Bengal, on 25th January 1894.

Following Ann's death,  Thomas and his son, Thomas Junior, returned to Dublin, where they were recorded living (or visiting) with Thomas' brother, William, in 1911. (See above.)

5)  Robert Benjamin Courtenay was born in the Royal Hospital on 27th October 1866, and was baptised in St. James' on 5th November 1866.  The sponsors at his baptism were James and Ann Tighe.  (Bina E. Martin wrongly gave a date of birth of 1862 for him, but the St. James' register is available online to view by way of confirmation of the correct date.)
As a child he spent time in the Royal Hibernian Military School. His records state he had been born on 27th October 1866, and entered the school on 15th January 1878. By trade he was a tailor (aged 12).  His father was a member of the county regiment called the Royal American Regiment, also known as the 60th Regiment of Foot 1st.
Robert was a military man, and was posted to  Fyzabad, Bengal, India where, on 21st November 1891, he married Edith Grant, the daughter of a John Grant.
    The Indian Army Quarterly List of 1st January 1912, recorded Robert Benjamin Courtenay as a warrant officer in the barrack department in Allahabad, Bengal.
        'The London Gazette' of 19th May 1916, recorded Robert Benjamin Courtenay under its heading for the Indian Army Departments as - "To be Assistant Commissary, with the honorary rank of Lieutenant. Conductor Robert Benjamin Courtenay. Dated 8th February 1916."

On 15th September 1921, the passenger list for the 'Castalia', sailing from Liverpool to Bombay, noted Major R.B. Courtenay, aged 54, and his wife, Mrs. Edith Courtenay, on board;  their English address was given as 'Green View', Heatherside Road, Surrey, and this was confirmed by the Surrey Electoral Register of 1921 which named Robert Benjamin Courtenay at the same address.
        The widowed Edith Courtenay, who had been born circa 1878,  died on 10th September 1936 in Lucknow, Bengal.

6)  Emilia/Emily Courtney was born 10th December 1868, at Royal Hospital and baptised on 17th December in St. James. The sponsors were Robert Courtney and Julia Doyle.   The sponsor, Robert Courtney, may well have been the Robert Courtenay Junior who was also admitted to the Freemen of Dublin in 1857 by virtue of being the grandson of the original Thomas Courtenay, Shearman, although this Robert Courtney would have had to be Catholic, since only Catholics were permitted to be sponsors in Catholic christenings.
     
Emilia Courtney, daughter of Thomas Courtenay, married Thomas Gallagher, son of Terence, in 1889.  The marriage registration certificate shows up better detail - the couple married on 29th December 1889 in Dublin's St. James' Catholic Church.  Emily Courtenay was 21, a servant who lived at 23 Echlin Street adjacent to St. James,  and whose father was Thomas Courtenay who worked at what seems to be something along the lines of 'messenger' although I could have this wrong. Thomas Gallagher was a 21-year-old brass finisher of 30 James Street, the son of a currier Terence Gallagher, a currier being a leather-finisher.The two witnesses were Thomas Murray and Ellen O'Leary.

Emily Courtenay and Thomas Gallagher had four children together, although only the eldest child survived childhood. This was Joseph Gallagher who was born on 19th March 1890 to Thomas Gallagher and Emily Courtney of School Street in the Liberties area of Dublin.  Present at Joseph's birth in 1890 was M. Gallagher of 9 School Street.
Daughter Mary Gallagher was born at 147 Thomas Street on 5th November 1891 to Thomas Gallagher, a brass finisher, but this infant only survived 30 minutes before dying.
Thomas Gallagher was born on 3rd December 1892 at 17 Bow Bridge, Kilmainham; his father, Thomas Gallagher was working as a plumber, and a member of the Courtenay family was present for the birth. This child, Thomas, died on 20th February 1894 aged only 14 months.
Daughter Catherine Gallagher was born on 12th November 1894 at 2 Bow Bridge, but she died on 18th December 1896 at 78 Francis Street.

Emily Gallagher, née Courtenay, was widowed young - her husband, Thomas Gallagher of Francis Street, died of pnemonia on 31st December 1896 aged only 27.  His widow and surviving son subsequently fell on hard times. Joseph Gallagher was arrested aged 17 in 1907 in Kilmainham for stealing a gold watch,  and subsequently served 1 month in jail.  His widowed mother, Emily, was named in the prison records as living at 18 Hardwicke Street.  Shortly afterwards she entered the Dublin workhouse, and was released on 12th September 1908.   She must have been readmitted almost immediately, since she died in the workhouse of lung disease on 9th October 1908 aged only 38.
Her son, Joseph Gallagher, married in St. Victor's Church on 25th March or May 1917.  His bride was named as Lilian Kate Hayes, the daughter of clerk James Hayes. Both bride and groom were living in Distillery House, Marrowbone Lane, in 1917, and Joseph was working for what seems to be 'C.R.M.S. and R.I. Rig' (?).  His father, Thomas Gallagher, was deceased.  The wedding was witnessed by W. Duelle and C. Hayes.


7)  Bina E. Martin identified a Catherine Courtenay born in 1871, and the civil registrations of births confirm her birth at the Royal Hospital on 20th January 1871.

8)  Edward Courtenay of Royal Hospital, was born on 16th September 1872 and baptised in St. James Church on 18th September 1872 and was sponsored by Elizabeth McCabe.

9)  Adelaide Courtenay was born on 26th December 1874 in the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham, and was baptised in St. James on 5th January 1875; she was sponsored by Patrick and Maria McCabe.
     On 19th September 1901,  Adelaide Courtenay married the Co. Down widower, James Clifford, in Grangegorman Church of Ireland church.   This was James' second marriage - the first had been to Charlotte Matilda Wright, the daughter of Frederick Wright, a caretaker who lived at 71 Rathmines Road.  James Clifford, a policeman, was stationed at the time in Dundrum.
James Clifford's first wife, Charlotte, died on 31st August 1898 - her husband, Constable James Clifford, was stationed in Bray, Wicklow, at the time of her death.
It seems that the Courtenay children, although baptised Catholic, were reared Protestant, since yet another of Thomas and Mary Courtenay's children had reverted to the Church of Ireland by adulthood.
James was a sergeant with the Royal Irish Constabulary, and was living in Bray, Co. Wicklow at the time of his Church of Ireland marriage to Adelaide.  His father was a farmer, William John Clifford.  Adelaide's address was given as 3 Avondale Road, Phibsboro.  Her father was a clerk, Thomas Courtenay, and the witnesses were a Meta Stringer and what seems to be James Smyth Mac Sighe.  A few months later, the 1901 census picks the newly-weds up at Fairview Terrace in Bray, Co. Wicklow, where Adelaide was living with her husband and his five children.
     A lady's maid named Sarah Courtenay, aged 22 (the age is wildly inaccurate however) and unmarried, was also in the household, and was stated to be a cousin of the head of the household, James Clifford.   This must surely be Adelaide's younger sister, Sarah, would later marry a John Bell. Adelaide Courtenay and James Clifford moved to England at the time of the Irish Civil War.
    The children of Adelaide Courtenay and James Clifford were:
     a) Ernest Clifford born 1901.
     b) Percival Clifford born 1902.
     c) Walter Clifford, born 1904, and who had Patricia in 1932, who had Lewis in 1958. Went to Australia.
     d) Albert Clifford, born 1908, who had John in 1931 and Terence in 1939.
     e) Adelaide Clifford, (1914 - 1990) who married Edward Dewey of Woodmancote, Gloucestershire, and who had Michael Dewey in 1946 and Robert Dewey in 1950.  Adelaide Dewey helped Bina E. Martin with her family tree.
      f) Ethel Clifford, born 1916, who married John Copley of Santa Barbara, California, and who had Paul Copley in 1944, and Judith Copley in 1940 who had Lynda in 1967 and James Patrick in 1970.

10)  Sarah Courtenay of Royal Hospital was born on 27th November 1876 and baptised in St. James on 5th December 1876; she was sponsored by Sarah Fulds.   On 3rd September 1901, she married a cattle-dealer, John Bell, the son of a farmer Thomas Bell. The wedding took place in Donaghmoine, Co. Monaghan, (Church of Ireland), and was witnessed by Richard and Eliza Bell. Sarah was noted as the daughter of a soldier, Thomas Courtenay, and was living in Monaghan at the time of the marriage.
The couple later adopted a daughter, Nora, who married a man by the name of Howell, and who had two sons, John and Ralph Howell.   Sarah Courtenay died in 1948, but I don't know where. (This from Bina E. Martin's research.)

11)  Sabina Courtenay was born in the Royal Hospital on May 23rd 1879 and was baptised in St. James on 3rd June 1879;  she was sponsored by Michael and Maria Baxter. Following her father's death in 1895, Sabina Courtenay was taken to England by friends of the family, where she wished to train as a ballet dancer.
 On 26th July 1900 in Lambeth Registry Office, she married a civil servant, Frederick Temple Martin, who had been born in 1868 in Lambeth, London, to Temple Chevallier Martin and Elizabeth Mary Parkyn, but the couple separated and divorced 11 years later.

The UK Civil Divorce Records (care of Ancestry.com) give the details. On 8th May 1911, Frederick Temple Martin of 'Lexden', King's Avenue, Clapham Park, petitioned for divorce, and the final decree was granted on 29th July 1912.
Following their 1900 marriage, he and Sabina had lived together at 13 Prospect Place, Surbiton;  there were three children born.  Elizabeth Sabina Martin was born on 7th November 1900 and was baptised in Lambeth All Saints Church on November 16th 1900,  Alice Courtenay Martin on 4th September 1906, and Temple Chevalier Martin on 1st May 1909. A fourth child, who didn't survive infancy, was Irene Clara Martin, who had been born in London in 1903, and who had died the following year.
Frederick Temple Martin cited his wife's adultery as the ground for divorce, and the court granted him custody of their three children.

In 1901, Sabina Martin, née Courtenay, was living with her 5-month old daughter, Bina E. Martin, in a flat at Herne Hill, Lambeth, while Frederick was at home with his father and brothers. He stated on the census return that he was single, not married.
The 1911 census showed Frederick living with the three children at 183 King's Avenue, Clapham, while Sabina was living at 164 Barcombe Avenue, Wandsworth, Streathem.  She had filled the return out twice.  The first entry was scribbled out, and read 'Subina Elizabeth Martin, aged 30, married 11 years, 4 children born alive, 3 surviving.'   She filled out the second line as 'Subina Courtenay, single, dressmaking.'

Sabina Courtenay was listed on the electoral registers at this same address for the next few years.  She died in Streathem in 1933 and was buried in the cemetery there.

"I was always fond of my father and like to remember him  best in the very early days when we lived at Surbiton-on-Thames.  He had a punt at Thames Ditton and loved to picnic on the river at week-ends.  The uncles often came down from London and joined in the fun, particularly in the cherry season, for we had a huge white-heart cherry tree in the garden of our little home and they used to climb the tree and pick quantities of these luscious fruits.  We lived here for almost the first eight years of my life until shortly before my grandmother died when we moved up to London to share my grandfather's new home in Clapham Park."   (Bina Elizabeth Martin on her father, Frederick Temple Martin.)

Frederick Temple Martin married a second time in 1918.  Wife Number Two was Minnie Sarah Boyd who had been born in 1891 in Lambeth. They had a son, Richard Temple Martin (1921 - 1979).  Frederick Temple Martin died at 23 Cowdrag House, Dog Kennell Hill, East Dulwich, on 21st December 1933, and his widow, Minnie Sarah Martin, administered his estate.

The three children of Frederick Temple Martin and Sabina Courtenay emigrated to New Zealand;  the oldest, Sabina Elizabeth Martin (7th November 1900 - 19th May 1985), later settled in South Africa. Her obituary was published in 'Veld & Flora' in September 1985:

'Bina Elizabeth Martin was born on 7 November 1900 at Surbiton-on-Thames as the eldest of three children.  Later the family lived in with her grandparents in "Lexden", their home in Clapham Park, S.W. London.  When it was sold Bina was sent to boarding school at Margate in Kent.
Having joined the Civil Service at the age of 16 during World War 1 she became financially independent when it was over and accompanied her grandfather and uncle to the Channel Islands and Europe....
...She was always an enthusiast and did everything with verve...she was particularly keen on the outdoors and loved nature and animals, especially dogs.  Strangely she did not like music, but said the sounds of nature were music to her.
In 1926 Bina, her younger sister and young brother decided it would be a great adventure to see the other side of the world, and on November 7 they set sail for New Zealand, while their 84-year-old grandfather waved goodbye from the quayside at Southampton.
In New Zealand they surmounted the difficulties caused by the economic depression. Her brother became a pilot and her sister was married. Meantime Bina, having always been fond of outdoor life, became apprenticed in 1928 as a gardener at Dunedin Botanic Gardens, with the idea of obtaining the N.D.H. (N.Z.) - a six year course.  Meantime she continued her adventurous life climbing the hiking trails in the New Zealand Alps and studying the flora. However, after five years, she decided to emigrate to South Africa in 1932....
....Bina started her career in South Africa in Ban Hoek, where she assisted Miss K. Stanford in her Wild Flower Nursery.
In 1936 Bina obtained a post at the National Botanic Gardens (in) Kirstenbosch under the Director, Professor Compton, and later was put in charge of the bulb section in the nursery....
...In 1940 Bina volunteered to join the W.A.A.S. as a driver, and after a year in Cape Town she volunteered to serve in the Middle East, and was mentioned in dispatches for distinguished service in 1943...
....After the war ended Bina was discharged in England, and went to Bedford College, London University, where she gained a diploma in Social Services. "
Bina returned to South Africa in 1947 and took up her old post in charge of the bulb garden in the Botanic Gardens in Kirstenbosch where she worked under Professor Compton for many years - a bulb was named after her, the Lachenalia Martinae, which she had collected in 1937.  Bina retired in 1965, and was made an Honorary Life Member of the Botanical Society of South Africa.

In 1930, Bina Martin's sister, Alice Courtenay Martin (1906 - 1989), married Burton Murrell of Lake Manapouri, New Zealand, whose family was a well-known pioneering family from the region.  They later ran a guesthouse there. Their children were Jack Murrell, Burton Murrell, Margaret Murrell and Bina Murrell.

The youngest child of Frederick Temple Martin and Sabina Courtenay, Temple Martin, became a pilot, serving with the Royal New Zealand Air Force as a ground engineer during the 2nd World War, and worked later as an aeronautical engineer in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand.

Bina Elizabeth Martin, the daughter of Frederick Temple Martin and Sabina Courtenay, published two genealogical books, detailing her excellent research into the Martin and Edgecumbe families - 'Parsons and Prisons' and 'Edgecumbes of Edgecumbe'.

Martin Family Genealogy:
The motto of the Martin family of Killaloe, Co. Clare was 'Sic Itur ad Astra' (ie: this is the way to the stars)  is the same as the motto used by the Martins of Ross, Co.Galway, and by the Martins of Ballynahinch, Co. Galway, although an early genalogical link between the Galway and Clare families has not yet been uncovered.
The earliest known member of the Martins of Killaloe was Rev. James Martin (1744 - 1824), magistrate and curate of Killaloe Cathedral, who married, in about 1777, Frances Janns.  Rev. James Martin's obituary appeared in the Freeman's Journal of 28th September 1824:
   'On Saturday at Killaloe, at the advances age of 80 years, the Rev. James Martin, who for upwards of 50 years officiated as Reader in the Cathedral of that Diocese.  He was a most active Magistrate for many years, an office of which he discharged the arduous and important duties in a period of much peril.  He was a kind neighbour and a great benefactor to the poor.'

The four sons of Rev. James Martin and Frances Janns were:
Captain Nicholas Martin 1779 - 1830
Rev. Richard Martin 1780 - 1858
Rev. James Martin 1782 - 1847
Michael Martin Esq. 1784 - 1860. (J.P. , Co. Clare.) The youngest son, Michael Martin J.P., was born on 29th May 1784, and married, on 18th May 1803, Margaret Kingsley.  Their son was Rev. Richard Martin (1805 - 1852) who emigrated from Clare to England.

This son, Rev. Richard Martin (1805 - 1852), entered Trinity, Dublin, aged 18, on 18th October 1824, and graduated in 1829.  In 1833 he was recorded as the Incumbent of St. John's, Greenock, Scotland.  In 1834 he married Emma Mary Pilcher, née Edgcumbe (1807 - 1871), the daughter of Pierce Edgcumbe of Kent, the Edgcumbes of Kent being a branch of the Lords Mount Edgcumbe of Devonshire.    Rev. Richard Martin did a stint as the vicar of Dore, Derby, before taking up a post as chaplain aboard a convict ship, first in Gosport, then in Woolwich.   Rev. Richard Martin died of bronchitis in 1852, and his widow, Emma Mary Martin, became Governor of the Female Convict Prison at Brixton, a post she she held for 17 years before being pensioned off in 1870.  She died at 53 Clapham Park Road on 5th October 1871.

Rev. Richard Martin and Emma Mary Edgcumbe had twelve children in total, one of whom was Temple Chevallier Martin (1842 - 1933), the grandfather of Sabina Elizabeth Martin of South Africa. He was born at Dore Parsonage on 22nd November 1842, and was named after his mother's first cousin, the Rev. Temple Chevallier (1794 - 1873), the first professor of astronomy and mathematics at Durham University who recreated Foucault's pendulum in Durham Castle to demonstrate the rotation of the earth.
Temple Chevallier Martin spent thirty years as Chief Clerk at the Lambeth Police Court, and married Elizabeth Mary Parkyn (1845 - 1909), the daughter of Frederick Silly Parkyn and Anne Everest of St. Pancras, London.   The Parkyn family originated in Bodmin, Cornwall, where, apparently, the family name of 'Silly' translates as 'blessed', 'innocent' or 'holy'.  Frederick Silly Parkyn was the Steward of the Female Prison in Brixton, where Temple Chevallier Martin's mother also worked.

Sabina Elizabeth Martin's father, Frederick Temple Martin (1868 - 1933), born 31st January 1868, was the eldest of six sons born to Temple Chevallier Martin and Elizabeth Mary Parkyn.   He was educated at Merchant Taylors' School, and entered the civil service like his father, rising to the position of Magistrate at the South Western Police Court, a post he held until his retirement in 1929.